Travel, parking and things to do in Bristol

Travel

Bristol is well-served by public transport.  There are two railway stations (Bristol Parkway, on the outskirts of the city and Bristol Temple Meads, near the city centre). Bristol International Airport is eight miles south of the city centre, and Bristol is linked to the M4 and M5 motorways via the M32 which will bring you right into the city centre. For further details, please see the University's maps and travel information.

Parking

You are welcome to use the University car parks from 5 pm on Friday evening and throughout the weekend at no charge. There are University car parks in University Road, Woodland Road (including the Hawthorns), Priory Road and St Michael’s Park. Parking is also available along University Walk. Much of the nearby street parking now requires a parking permit or is metered, so please do take care where you park. The University has many disabled parking spaces so we ask you to please respect these.

Parking in the Halls of Residences is free of charge however, in a change to previous years, a permit will be required and must be displayed in your vehicle. This permit will be available at registration points and Hall reception desks.

Things to do and see in Bristol

  • Cabot Circus is Bristol's £500 million shopping centre.
  • Bristol is home to the oldest working theatre in England, the Bristol Old Vic (open since 1766), and newer venues for drama such as the nationally acclaimed Tobacco Factory
  • The Gothic St Mary Redcliffe church, which Queen Elizabeth I described as 'the fairest, goodliest and most famous parish church in England'.
  • The Arnolfini is one of Europe's leading centres for the contemporary arts.
  • The Watershed is Britain's foremost centre for film, photography and new media.
  • Brunel’s ss Great Britain is the world’s first great ocean liner and winner of the Gulbenkian Prize for Museum of the Year 2006.
  • At-Bristol is a £97-million project at the heart of Bristol's rejuvenated Harbourside area.
  • M Shed, Bristol’s newest museum, is dedicated to telling the amazing history of the city, through the objects and stories of the people who have made the city what it is today.
  • Bristol Cathedral with its Norman Chapter House.
  • The Georgian House offers a fascinating glimpse of Georgian interiors and furniture.
  • Live music venues, such as the Colston Hall and St George’s Bristol cater to both popular and classical tastes.
  • The Red Lodge Museum, Park Street, is an historic Elizabethan house with an amazing oak room and a stunning walled garden.
  • The City Museum and Art Gallery contains a wealth of exhibits of history, nature and art, with work by Renoir, Bellini, Gainsborough, Millais and members of the Bristol School.
  • The Royal West of England Academy is Bristol's finest art gallery.
  • Bristol Zoo Gardens in Clifton is a long-established centre for animal conservation and breeding, with a commitment to educating the public about the natural world.
  • Brunel designed the Clifton Suspension Bridge and the nearby Clifton Observatory with its 19th-century camera obscura.

There are many other things to see and do in Bristol, please see www.visitbristol.co.uk for further details of attractions in the city and local area.

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