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Skye sculpture to celebrate Bristol mountaineer

Artist's impression of the Collie MacKenzie sculpture

Artist's impression of the Collie MacKenzie sculpture

6 August 2010

A community group from Sconser on the Isle of Skye in Scotland plan to celebrate the achievements of Bristol alumnus and internationally renowned climber Norman Collie and his great friend and fellow climber John Mackenzie by building a life size bronze sculpture of both me

A community group from Sconser on the Isle of Skye in Scotland plan to celebrate the achievements of Bristol alumnus and internationally renowned climber Norman Collie and his great friend and fellow climber John Mackenzie by building a life size bronze sculpture of both men. The figures will be placed on the top rock at Sligachan on Skye looking towards the Cuillin ridge.
 
Collie studied chemistry at University College, Bristol from 1877-1879. As well as being a ground-breaking climber, he also went on to become an eminent scientist, performing important research that led to the taking of the first x-ray for diagnosing medical conditions.

John Mackenzie, the son of a crofter, was born and lived all his life on Skye. He worked as a mountain guide for 50 years. His greatest client, and later life-long friend, was Collie. They began climbing together on Skye in 1890, making important first attempts of climbs as well as topological discoveries. Together they formed a legendary partnership as mountaineering pioneers. Both men introduced many people to these climbs, popularising both the area and the activity and opening the way for generations of climbers to come.

The sculpture project is already well under way, with planning permission granted and designs for a car park and walkway to the sculpture allowing disabled access. The group instigated the removal of four Hydro poles which run across the site at Sligachan. The group are now offering people the opportunity to donate bronze to go towards building the sculpture. The sculpture will weigh approximately 400,000 grams; each gram will cost £1.

For more information see www.skyesculpture.com