Interpreting the Stonehenge palisade by integrating archaeology and cultural astronomy - Lionel Sims

26 February 2020, 1.00 PM - 26 February 2020, 3.00 PM

Lionel Sims, Emeritus Head of Anthropology, University of East London

G.10, 43 Woodland Road

Interpreting the Stonehenge palisade by integrating archaeology and cultural astronomy

The Stonehenge Palisade was a Late Neolithic/Early Bronze Age two kilometre linear timber fence that ran alongside Stonehenge and its final Avenue approach. Within its middle section was a three to four hundred metre gap. Four archaeology models of the Palisade are evaluated and revised against the presently known properties of this structure.

The significant emphasis in all four models on horizon viewing, and their retained properties after critique, are subsequently integrated by skyscape archaeology into an emergent inter-disciplinary model.

This new model suggests that by the Palisades design of interrupted obscuration and the agency of skyscape knowledge in a planar stationary geocentric earth cosmology, a ritual purpose of the Stonehenge monument complex was to simulate a journey through the underworld.

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