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Shelling out for dinner: dolphins learn foraging skills from peers 26 June 2020 A new study demonstrates for the first time that dolphins can learn foraging techniques outside the mother-calf bond – showing that they have a similar cultural nature to great apes. The findings, led by an international research team including academics at the University of Bristol, are published in Current Biology.
  • Shelling out for dinner: dolphins learn foraging skills from peers 26 June 2020 A new study demonstrates for the first time that dolphins can learn foraging techniques outside the mother-calf bond – showing that they have a similar cultural nature to great apes. The findings, led by an international research team including academics at the University of Bristol, are published in Current Biology.
  • Bizarre saber-tooth predator from South America was no saber-tooth cat 26 June 2020 A new study led by researchers from the University of Bristol has shown that not all saber-tooths were fearsome predators.
  • Insect crunching reptiles on ancient islands of the UK 18 June 2020 By analysing the fossilised jaw mechanics of reptiles who lived in the Severn Channel region of the UK 200-million-years ago, researchers from the University of Bristol have shown that they weren’t picky about the types of insects they ate - enjoying both crunchy and less crunchy varieties.
  • What are the effects of climate change on pollinators and human health? 12 June 2020 Three quarters of crop species depend on pollinators, but the service they provide is under increasing threat from climate change. An international collaboration, led by the University of Bristol, will investigate the effects of climate change on pollinators and people’s diet thanks to funding of nearly €1 million from The Belmont Forum.
  • ‘Matador’ guppies trick predators 12 June 2020 Trinidadian guppies behave like matadors, focusing a predator’s point of attack before dodging away at the last moment, new research shows.
  • Extinct camelids reveal insights about North America’s ancient savannas 11 June 2020 A new study looking at extinct camelids - ancestors of today’s camels and llamas - tells the story of North America’s ancient savannas and highlights how past climatic and environmental conditions influenced the composition of mammalian faunas.
  • Disorder in fish shoals may reap rewards at dinner time 2 June 2020 The advantages of animals foraging in an orderly group are well-known, but research by the University of Bristol has found an element of unruly adventure can help fish in the quest for food.
  • When Somerset lay beneath the sea 1 June 2020 In a new study, University of Bristol geologists show how the Mendip Hills in Somerset were overwhelmed by the ocean more than 200 million years ago.
  • Evolution of colour vision in sea snakes 29 May 2020 New research has revealed the evolution of colour vision in elapid snakes following their transition from terrestrial to fully marine environments, and for the first time, provided evidence of where, when and how frequently the species have adapted their ability to see in colour.
  • Bristol scientists see through glass frogs’ translucent camouflage 26 May 2020 Glass frogs are well known for their see-through skin but, until now, the reason for this curious feature has received no experimental attention.
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