MSc Climate change science and policy

Concern about global environmental change has never been greater. The University of Bristol’s MSc in Climate Change Science and Policy trains highly skilled graduates for professional employment in the public and private sectors, academia, consultancies, and non-governmental/advocacy organisations.

The curriculum is aimed at talented graduates seeking to enter, or upgrade their expertise in, the fields of climate change science, policy and analysis.

The programme is provided by three of Bristol’s leading science departments - Geography, Earth Sciences and Chemistry - with world-class research groups in four key areas of the science:

  • Climate change science and its links to policy and policymakers
  • Modelling of the Earth System, from simple box models to complex climate models
  • Remote Sensing of the environment and GIS
  • Understanding past climate change and making predictions of future change

The University is a world-leading centre for research and teaching in climate and Earth system processes, climate change science and future climate change impacts and offers an exciting atmosphere for postgraduate study, with a strongly international and interdisciplinary student community.

The programme is closely linked to the newly-founded Cabot Institute, which brings together all of the University’s research into the changing global environment across the sciences, social sciences and engineering.

The largest city in South West England, Bristol is known for its vibrant arts and cultural scene, and for being home to cutting-edge green industry and urban planning initiatives.

Start your application

View the course flyer [PDF, 242 KB]

Read about the University of Bristol's climate change research

Contact information

View the prospectus or contact the Postgraduate Admissions Office for more information.

What our graduates say

"The course prepared me perfectly for my career. I am able to use the climate modelling skills I learnt at Bristol on a daily basis modelling UK atmospheric emissions and interpreting their potential impacts and future trends".

Source: Robert Mitchell, MRes Earth System Science, 2012.