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Publication - Dr Adam Perriman

    Artificial cell membrane binding thrombin constructs drive in situ fibrin hydrogel formation for tissue engineering

    Citation

    Deller, R, Richardson, T, Richardson, R, Bevan, L, Zampetakis, I, Scarpa, F & Perriman, A, 2019, ‘Artificial cell membrane binding thrombin constructs drive in situ fibrin hydrogel formation for tissue engineering’. Nature Communications.

    Abstract

    We describe a self-contained tissue engineering methodology where the plasma membrane of human mesenchymal stem cells is modified to display multiple copies of a novel thrombin construct, giving rise to spontaneous fibrin hydrogel nucleation and growth at human plasma concentrations of fibrinogen. The
    cell membrane modification process is realised through the synthesis of a membrane-binding supercationic thrombin-polymer surfactant complex, and the resulting robust cellular fibrin hydrogel constructs support cell proliferation and multilineage differentiation for up to 23 days. The resulting tissue
    engineered constructs, which were differentiated down osteogenic and adipogenic lineages, exhibit Young’s moduli that reflect their respective extra-cellular matrix compositions, with osteogenic constructs showing a significant increase in stiffness when compared with the adipogenic analogue. Finally, we
    demonstrate that the approach could be adapted in the future for in vivo tissue engineering via transplantation of thrombin labelled fibroblasts into a zebrafish skin wound model.

    Full details in the University publications repository