Engineering Studentships in SCEEM - EPSRC Doctoral Training Partnerships (DTP)

The DTP scholarships cover the following for 3.5 years:

  • Tuition fees at home/EU rate Tax free stipend (£15,009pa for 2019/20)
  • Travel/consumables budget

Eligibility Requirements:

Student eligibility information for EPSRC DTPs can be found at https://epsrc.ukri.org/skills/students/help/eligibility/. 

Normally, to be eligible for a full award a student must have no restrictions on how long they can stay in the UK and have been ordinarily resident in the UK for at least three years prior to 1 September 2020 (with some further constraint regarding residence for education). 

For further information regarding residence requirements, please see the regulations. These include further information, for example about refugees, migrant workers, residence for education and EEA nationals. 

Candidates must also comply with the entry requirements of the PhD programme they wish to be considered for. Completed PhD applications must be submitted to the University of Bristol ApplyYourself system no later than the 10 of April 2020. 

Applicants must be nominated by their potential supervisor to be considered for a funding award. This opportunity is not open to students applying to our CDT programmes. 

Early application is recommended if you would like to be considered for DTP funding. The first application deadline is February 21, 2020. A second round of applications will be considered (on a limited basis) if submitted by April 10, 2020. Applications received after April 10th will not be considered for a DTP funding award. Note: After this deadline, Projects can still be applied to by external-funded (included self-funded) applicants. 

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Computer Science| Electrical and Electronic | Engineering Mathematics

EPSRC Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) Awards in Computer Science

Fully funded DTP PhD studentship (entry Sept 2020)  

Early application is recommended if you would like to be considered for DTP funding. The first application deadline is February 21, 2020. A second round of applications will be considered (on a limited basis) if submitted by April 10, 2020. Applications received after April 10 will not be considered for a DTP funding award. Note: After this deadline, Projects can still be applied to by external-funded (included self-funded) applicants. 

Overview  
Up to six fully funded EPSRC Doctoral Training Partnership awards are available for PhD candidates in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Bristol on any topic that fits with the research interests of academic staffWe are particularly keen to see applications on the topics listed on this page 

The Department of Computer Science at the University of Bristol is an international centre of excellence in the foundations and applications of computing. Staff in the Department carry out internationally leading research in intelligent systems, digital media, foundations, personal systems, and architecture and design. 

Eligibility Criteria 
Applicants must meet the eligibility requirements for the PhD Research programme they wish to apply to. Requirements can be found on the Postgraduate Admissions Statement for each programme. 

Scholarship 
The studentship covers full UK/EU PhD tuition fees and a tax-free stipend at the current RCUK rate. Applicants must meet the EPSRC Student eligibility requirements (i.e. have been resident in the UK for three years prior to 1 September 2020).   

To enable universities to support the very best students, there is limited relaxation of student eligibility requirements each year. The EPSRC allows the University of Bristol to offer up to 10% of the new studentships in any one year with open eligibility. Applicants who do not meet the EPSRC requirements are welcome to apply for open positions yet should be aware that there is typically strong competition within the university to make use of this flexibility.  

How to Apply 
Prospective applicants should initially contact a member of academic staff to discuss their research interests before writing a 1-2 page research proposal.  

Applicants should start an application for Postgraduate Study through the University of Bristol system: (http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/). They should select 'Postgraduate Research' as the type of study.  

Once a profile has been created, log in via the link sent to your email, start an application and fill out details under each heading. Please ensure that you select 'Computer Science (PhD)' under 'Which programme are you applying to'. Please upload a research proposal under 'research statement' and include a personal statement and CV.   

Research Groups in Computer Science 

Visit Research Groups in Computer Science for information on current Research topics. 

The Cryptography and Information Security Group conducts research into cryptography, the underlying hard problems on which it is based, and the hardware and software needed to implement secure systems. 

The group has a particular interest in techniques for proving security of cryptographic systems, the efficient implementation of such systems on small computing devices, and the verification that such implementations do what they say they do.  We also have an interest in security auditing and computer forensics.  

Members of the Bristol Interaction Group build novel interactive devices, deploy new forms of interaction and evaluate technologies in everyday settings. The group comprises computer scientists, materials scientists and social scientists. They are known for their research with materials and devices, with applications in healthcare, sustainability and fabrication. 

The University of Bristol has a long tradition of excellence in Artificial Intelligence, with research groups in Engineering dating back to the 1970s and 1980s. Now all these traditions have converged to form the Intelligent Systems Laboratory (ISL), a leading research unit counting 12 members of staff (four professors) and about 50 PhD students and postdocs. 

Research activities include foundational work in machine learning (many of the ISL members work in this central area of research), and applications to web intelligence, machine translation, bioinformatics, semantic image analysis, robotics, as well as natural intelligent systems. 

Computational neuroscientists apply computational and mathematical approaches to the study of the brain and, in the other direction, seek to uncover insights into computation and mathematics by working with experimental neuroscientists in trying to understanding how the brain works.​ Our work draws inspiration from a wide range of disciplines (e.g. neuroscience, mathematics, machine learning, statistics, computer science and physics). 

Bristol Robotics Laboratory (BRL) is the most comprehensive academic centre for multi-disciplinary robotics research in the UK. It is a collaborative partnership between the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) and the University of Bristol, and home to a vibrant community of over 300 academics, researchers and industry practitioners. Together, they are world leaders in current thinking on service robotics, intelligent autonomous systems and bioengineering. An internationally recognised Centre of Excellence in Robotics, BRL’s state-of-the-art facilities cover an area of over 4,600 sq. metres (50,000 sq. feet). 

We study various aspects of the theory and practice of algorithms. The goal of our research is both to provide scalable solutions to existing problems and to understand the limits of what is possible. 

The quantity of data available in digital form continues to increase at an exponential rate. The need for faster and more accurate algorithms is now more important than ever before. We also want to understand where improvements are impossible by establishing provable lower bounds, both in terms of space and time.  

The Visual Information Laboratory of the University of Bristol exists to undertake innovative, collaborative and interdisciplinary research resulting in world leading technology in the areas of computer vision, image and video communications, content analysis and distributed sensor systems. VI-Lab was formed in 2010, merging the two well established research groups, Signal Processing (EEEng) and Computer Vision (CS). The two constituent groups offer shared and complementary strengths and, with a history of successful collaboration since 1993, their merger has created one of the largest groupings of its type in the UK. 

The Trustworthy Systems Laboratory (TSL) has been established to explore demonstrably trustworthy systems. Confidence in a system's trustworthiness can be gained in many different ways, including by design, through transparency, and through rigorous verification and validation. The new lab will help to address the increasing global demand for design techniques and systems that are not only reliable but also secure and robust to failures.  

TSL will focus on all aspects of trustworthiness throughout the system stack, from hardware to software, and addressing aspects such as safety and functional correctness, predictability, security, privacy, as well as traditional dependability, covering integrity, robustness, reliability and graceful degradation. 

The University of Bristol Cyber Security Group is part of the Academic Centre of Excellence in Cyber Security Research (ACE-CSR) at Bristol. The group’s research focuses on three over-arching but interlinked strands: security of cyber-physical infrastructures, software security and human behaviours. 

General Enquiries: For academic enquiries, please email François DupressoirDepartmental Postgraduate Director. For enquiries on the application process, please email sceem-pgr-admissions@bristol.ac.uk   

EPSRC Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) Awards Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Fully funded DTP PhD studentship (entry Sept 2020)  

Early application is recommended if you would like to be considered for DTP funding. The first application deadline is February 21, 2020. A second round of applications will be considered (on a limited basis) if submitted by April 10, 2020. Applications received after April 10th will not be considered for a DTP funding award. Note: After this deadline, Projects can still be applied to by external-funded (included self-funded) applicants. 

Overview  

Up to six fully funded EPSRC Doctoral Training Partnership awards are available for PhD candidates in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at the University of Bristol on any topic that fits with the research interests of academic staff 

The Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering has an international reputation for world-leading research in areas such as mobile and wireless communication systems, microelectronics, electrical energy management, photonics and optical communications, artificial vision and image analysis, and high-performance networks. It collaborates with more than 30 industrial organisations and has been successful in attracting substantial research funding from diverse sources in the UK, Europe and overseas. 

The department has a strong research profile, with 30 academic staff, more than 60 postgraduate research students and 30 full-time research assistants contributing to numerous research projects. The quality of our research is recognised nationally and internationally. 

Eligibility Criteria 

Applicants must meet the eligibility requirements for the PhD Research programme they wish to apply to. Requirements can be found on the Postgraduate Admissions Statement for each programme. 

Scholarship 

The studentship covers full UK/EU PhD tuition fees and a tax-free stipend at the current RCUK rate. Applicants must meet the EPSRC Student eligibility requirements (i.e. have been resident in the UK for 3 years prior to 1st September 2020).   

To enable universities to support the very best students, there is limited relaxation of student eligibility requirements each year. The EPSRC allows the University of Bristol to offer up to 10% of the new studentships in any one year with open eligibility. Applicants who do not meet the EPSRC requirements are welcome to apply for open positions yet should be aware that there is typically strong competition within the university to make use of this flexibility.  

How to Apply 
Prospective applicants should initially contact a member of academic staff to discuss their research interests before writing a 1-2 page research proposal.  

Applicants should start an application Postgraduate Study through the University of Bristol system: (http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/). They should select 'Postgraduate Research' as the type of study.  

Once a profile has been created, log in via the link sent to your email, start an application and fill out details under each heading. Please ensure that you select 'Electrical and Electronic Engineering (PhD)' under 'Which programme are you applying to'. Please upload a research proposal under 'research statement' and include a personal statement and CV.   

Research Groups in Electrical and Electronic Engineering 

Communication Systems and Networks 
Modern communication systems and networks play a vitally important role in nearly every aspect of our society. The CSN group has been at the forefront of research for more than 25 years and its pioneering work impacts the energy, healthcare, transport, semiconductor and telecommunications sectors. The group specialises in end-to-end wireless connectivity, while focusing on the following activities: 

  •  Antenna design and RF technologies
  • Channel measurement and prediction
  • Information theory and advanced wireless access
  • Gigabit broadband wireless (including 5G and beyond)
  • Self-Learning Networks, and networked AI systems
  • Connected and Automated Vehicles

Electrical Energy Management 
The Electrical Energy Management group researches, designs, builds and tests advanced energy conversion systems containing renewable energy, power electronic and electro-mechanical conversion systems, and energy storage elements to optimise efficiency or power/energy density. The group places a growing emphasis on the efficient management of electrical energy and focuses its research in two main areas:  

  • More-electric technologies: modelling, design and optimisation of generators, motors and actuators for application in hybrid-electric vehicles and renewable energy conservation.
  • Low-power systems: design and system-level modelling of vibration energy harvesting devices and power electronic devices and circuits.

Visual Information Laboratory 
Vision science research at Bristol is at the forefront of the study of human and animal vision, artificial vision systems and image analysis. The Visual Information Laboratory stimulates interdisciplinary research to promote the future development of this field. The group's core research areas of coding and transport also include new parametric coding and analysis methods, distributed video coding and image fusion. The group's activities fall into three main areas: 

  • Efficient algorithms and architectures 
  • Error resilience and transport 
  • Image and video content analysis 

Photonics 
Photonics, the science of light, underpins many recent developments in communications, solar power, lighting, data storage and displays, and could even lead to a quantum revolution in computing. Optical fibre communications form the backbone of all land-based communications. The Photonics group pursues research topics that lead to cheaper and faster information and communication technologies, inexpensive sensors to revolutionise healthcare, and new methods of harvesting renewable energy. Cutting-edge research focuses on three key areas: 

  • Photonic quantum information: secure quantum key distribution, photon sources, quantum gates and integrated quantum circuits. 
  • Optical communications: optical transmission and optical switching technologies. 
  • Photonic materials and devices: low dimensional semiconductor quantum structures, photonic device fabrication and characterisation, nanophotonics, solar cells and sensors. 

Microelectronics 
The Microelectronics Research Group is a team of academic experts in computer architecture, design verification, fault tolerance, reconfigurable technologies and high-performance computing. The group brings together researchers from a range of academic disciplines to address its primary research theme of energy-aware computing, with expertise across the entire system stack, from transistors to software applications. 

The High Performance Networks (HPN) Group specialises in the application of advanced hardware and software technologies, targeting the future optical networks for Internet of Things (IoTs), data centres, grid/cloud based applications and distributed technologies etc. The Group is equipped with world-class laboratories, including state of the art optical transmission testbeds and software-defined network experimental platforms.

  • Next generation optical transmission networks
  • Optical packet and burst switching
  • Optical data centre solutions and architecture
  • Grid and cloud networking
  • Software defined networking (SDN) and optical network virtualisation
  • Hybrid-network domains orchestration and service management
  • Self-Learning Networks, and networked AI systems
  • Smart City ICT Solutions.

General Enquiries 

For academic enquiries, please email Prof Robert Piechocki (R.J.Piechocki@bristol.ac.ukDepartmental Postgraduate Director. For enquiries on the application process, please email sceem-pgr-admissions@bristol.ac.uk  

EPSRC Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) Awards in Engineering Mathematics

Fully funded DTP PhD studentship (entry Sept 2020)

Early application is recommended if you would like to be considered for DTP funding. The first application deadline is February 21, 2020. A second round of applications will be considered (on a limited basis) if submitted by April 10, 2020. Applications received after April 10th will not be considered for a DTP funding award. Note: After this deadline, Projects can still be applied to by external-funded (included self-funded) applicants. 

Overview
Up to eight fully funded EPSRC Doctoral Training Partnership awards are available for PhD candidates in the Department of Engineering Mathematics at the University of Bristol on any topic that fits with the research interests of academic staff.

Members of the Department of Engineering Mathematics carry out cutting-edge research in areas where mathematics is being applied to future challenges in engineering, industry and the life sciences. The department also makes fundamental theoretical and computational advances. There is a strong tradition of interdisciplinary work, international collaboration and publication in leading research journals.

Eligibility Criteria

Applicants must meet the eligibility requirements for the PhD Research programme they wish to apply to. Requirements can be found on the Postgraduate Admissions Statement for each programme.

Scholarship

The studentship covers full UK/EU PhD tuition fees and a tax-free stipend at the current RCUK rate. Applicants must meet the EPSRC Student eligibility requirements (i.e. have been resident in the UK for three years prior to 1 September 2020).

To enable universities to support the very best students, there is limited relaxation of student eligibility requirements each year. The EPSRC allows the University of Bristol to offer up to 10% of the new studentships in any one year with open eligibility. Applicants who do not meet the EPSRC requirements are welcome to apply for open positions yet should be aware that there is typically strong competition within the university to make use of this flexibility.

How to Apply

Prospective applicants should initially contact a member of academic staff to discuss their research interests before writing a 1-2 page research proposal. Only applications that have the support of a prospective supervisor will be considered for a DTP award.

Applicants should start an application Postgraduate Study through the University of Bristol system: (http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/). They should select 'Postgraduate Research' as the type of study.

Once a profile has been created, log in via the link sent to your email, start an application and fill out details under each heading. Please ensure that you select 'Engineering Mathematics (PhD)' under 'Which programme are you applying to'. Please upload a research proposal under 'research statement' and include a personal statement and CV.

Priority topic: We are particularly keen to receive applications on the following Research topic:

Mathematical modelling of short-term energy storage: In the coming years, we need to take significant steps to move away from fossil fuel power generation and towards renewable sources. However, these come with their own challenges. For many types of renewable energy, the energy sources are highly variable, and the power generation systems have low inertia, making them more sensitive to these fluctuations. A promising way of dealing with this is to smooth power variability using short term energy storage systems like supercapacitors, flywheels, and superconducting magnetic energy storage. While aspects of short-term energy storage are well-understood, mathematical modelling will be valuable for understanding the strengths and limitations of different energy storage systems and exploring how they are best controlled and used in order to achieve good power quality. Depending on the interests and background of the student, this project could involve modelling of particular short term energy storage systems (e.g. adapting existing models of Li-ion batteries to modelling Li-ion supercapacitors) and/or analysing the effects of different types of short term storage on grid-scale power systems.

If you are interested in this project, contact Dr Cameron Hall (cameron.hall@bristol.ac.uk).

Visit Research Groups in Engineering Mathematics for information on other current Research topics:

The Applied Nonlinear Mathematics Group is firmly rooted in a culture of solving real-world problems. Applications include traffic flow, optical devices, novel materials, aircraft dynamics, rotating machinery, epilepsy biomechanics and electrical networks. The group also undertakes fundamental research in areas such as local and global bifurcation theory, manifold computation, mathematical biology, non-smooth systems, delay differential equations, partial differential equations and control theory.

The University has a long tradition of excellence in artificial intelligence, with research groups in engineering dating back to the 1970s and 1980s. Now all these traditions have converged to form the Intelligent Systems Laboratory, a research unit with 16 members of staff (five professors) and about 40 PhD students and postdoctoral researchers. Research activities include foundational work in machine learning (many of the unit's members work in this central area of research), and applications to web intelligence, machine translation, bioinformatics, semantic image analysis and robotics, uncertainty modelling and fuzzy systems, as well as natural intelligent systems.

Many systems in nature and industry consist of a myriad of parts that act together following complex and often self-organised patterns of interactions. Swarms of animals, human societies or companies in complex supply networks are only some examples of this type of complex system.

The Collective Dynamics group addresses the question how system-level function and phenomena arise from the interplay of parts in these systems.

Computational neuroscientists apply computational and mathematical approaches to the study of the brain and, in the other direction, seek to uncover insights into computation and mathematics by working with experimental neuroscientists in trying to understand how the brain works. We are interested in the algorithmic structure of the central nervous system and the neurobiological systems and mechanisms that support them.

The Robotics research group works on a wide range of challenges covering both hardware and software aspects of robotics: sensing, perception, reasoning, cooperation, control and actuation. We work in partnership with the University of the West of England through the Bristol Robotics Lab, a joint community based in a dedicated 4,500sqm facility on UWE’s Frenchay Campus.

The Bristol SoftLab focuses on the research and development of novel compliant systems and soft robotic technologies. Softness and compliance are exploited by Nature in almost all organisms and these properties are crucial for future robotic, wearable and human-interaction technologies. We aim to enhance our understanding of why compliance is needed, how to control and exploit it, and where to apply and exploit it to maximise societal and scientific impact. Our research encompasses the full spectrum of soft robotics research and development from smart materials, through soft-smart mechanisms to complete soft machines and devices.

General Enquiries: For academic enquiries, please email Dr Filippo Simini (f.Simini@bristol.ac.uk), Departmental Postgraduate Director, or Dr Paul Marshall (p.marshall@bristol.ac.uk), School Postgraduate Director. For enquiries on the application process, please email sceem-pgr-admissions@bristol.ac.uk.

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