Events

    University of Bristol Diversity Lecture

    Accommodating Religious Diversity in Secular Institutions

    Professor Tariq Modood, SPAIS

    Thursday 6th July 2017

    Peel Lecture Theatre, Geographical Sciences, University Road, BS8 1SS

    Professor Tariq Modood will discuss how as religious diversity increasingly becomes a feature of countries like Britain, it is clear that religion is not just diversifying, but is changing. How are academics, politicians and organisations – including universities – having to re-think the place of religion in secular institutions? Staff and students are invited to attend this inaugural University of Bristol Diversity Lecture.

    Free but booking is required at equality-bookings@bristol.ac.uk

    More information about Professor Tariq Modood.

    More information about topic:

    As religious diversity increasingly becomes a feature of countries like Britain it is clear that religion is not just diversifying but is changing. While religious belief and participation in organised religion continues to be in decline, for many religious people religion is assuming an increasing significance and centrality. Religion today is not just understood as private belief but as highly visible practices (eg., to do with dress, food, gender relations) and public identities that, no less than say ethnicity, gender and sexuality, seek public recognition and institutional accommodation – not just tolerated but mainstreamed. This is not religion as a discrete activity or identity but one which is interwoven with and mutually shapes ethnicity, community and politics. For some it can be a cultural identity or a basis of political solidarity even in the absence of theological beliefs. At the same time, religion or perceived religious affiliation can be the basis of discrimination, racism, Islamophobia, hate politics and other forms of exclusion of minorities. Hence religion is part of the ‘equality and diversity’ family – even if a neglected one. A result of these developments is that academics, politicians and organisations – including universities – are having to re-think the place of religion in secular institutions in dialogue with religious people.