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Publication - Professor Christopher Jarrold

    Individual Differences in Frequency of Inner Speech

    Differential Relations with Cognitive and Non-cognitive Factors

    Citation

    Ren, X, Wang, T & Jarrold, C, 2016, ‘Individual Differences in Frequency of Inner Speech: Differential Relations with Cognitive and Non-cognitive Factors’. Frontiers in Psychology, vol 7.

    Abstract

    Inner speech plays a crucial role in behavioral regulation and the use of inner speech is very common among adults. However, less is known about individual differences in the frequency of inner speech use and about the underlying processes that may explain why people exhibit individual differences in the frequency of inner speech use. This study was conducted to investigate how individual differences in the frequency of inner speech use are related to cognitive and non-cognitive factors. Four functions of inner speech including self-criticism, self-reinforcement, self-management, and social assessment measured by an adapted version of Brinthaupt’s Self-Talk Scale were examined. The cognitive factors that were considered included executive functioning and complex reasoning and the non-cognitive factors consisted of trait anxiety and impulsivity. Data were collected from a large Chinese sample. Results revealed that anxiety and impulsivity were mainly related to the frequency of the affective function of inner speech (self-criticism and self-reinforcement) and executive functions and complex reasoning were mainly related to the frequency of the cognitive, self-regulatory function of inner speech (self-management).

    Full details in the University publications repository