Global political economy: transformations and policy analysis pathway

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Global political economy

What is it?

This PhD training pathway is designed to foreground the dynamics of global transformation and their policy implications as well as their interrelations with national and regional institutional and social responses to the changing global political and economic order. As such, it seeks to foster dialogue and debate between the nationally-grounded assumptions and discourses on which much social science continues to be predicated, and other perspectives which seek to transcend these assumptions. Among other things the pathway will encourage students to analyse the diverse experiences and impacts of economic globalisation, examine relationships between global governance and inequality and to understand that analysis and resolution of many of the key problems that confront humanity in the 21st century require new and inter-disciplinary academic approaches, innovative methods and policy agendas, creative thinking and transnationally comparative datasets.

Who is it for?

The Global Political Economy: Transformations and Policy Analysis pathway will train researchers who understand the new dynamics of global transformation, can engage, inter alia, with emerging forms of global governance, and are committed to addressing global inequalities. The pathway will be of interest to those with disciplinary or interdisciplinary backgrounds in politics, economics, geography, sociology, law, history, international relations, policy studies, development studies and area studies.

What are the prerequisites?

Global Political Economy: Transformations and Policy Analysis will offer 1+3 and +3 studentships. Students applying for the 1+3 programme will have a high honours undergraduate degree or equivalent from a relevant discipline. Students applying for entry to the +3 programme in the 2014/15 academic year, must have completed a MRes or MSc programme with appropriate research training or equivalent by September 2014. Students applying for entry to the +3 programme in the 2015/16 academic year, must have completed a MRes or MSc programme with appropriate research training or equivalent by September 2015.

What will I study in the first year?

Research training in the Global Political Economy: Transformations and Policy Analysis pathway will follow the standard SWDTC interdisciplinary format; i.e. three core research training modules will be selected from the consortium’s offerings in research design, data collection and data analysis. There will be one pathway specific module and two modules will be selected from an open list. The core research training modules will include a module called Advanced Interdisciplinary Research Design. This module will address the characteristics and challenges of ‘doing’ interdisciplinary research in a globalised world. It will be mandatory core training for this pathway.

The pathway specific module will be a custom-designed and co-convened core course entitled Global Transformations - Issues and Trajectories. This core module will be team taught by a crossinstitutional group of colleagues guided by a designated pathway co-ordinator. It will introduce students to key concepts and debates in this field including the different forms of globalisation, global governance, global inequalities, and the developmental implications of the ‘rising powers’ of Asia.

Who will supervise my thesis?

All students will have two supervisors with different disciplinary perspectives on Global Political Economy: Transformations and Policy Analysis. Students proposing cross-institutional supervision are particularly encouraged. These supervisors will convene joint meetings on a regular basis, and will attend the annual one-day workshop for all pathway students.

When would it start?

Self funded students can still apply to start in September 2014. Students applying for funding for the 2015/16 academic year will be expected to start in September 2015. The application cycle for the 2015/16 academic year will open in October 2014.

How many studentships are there in this pathway?

Up to two studentships per year will be awarded on a competitive basis.

How do I apply?

  • Work out your substantive research topic
  • Contact the pathway lead at your preferred host University (Bristol or Bath) with a brief description of your proposed topic (no more than 1 page). We will then put you in touch with potential supervisor(s) for your topic.
  • Write a 1000-word proposal, outlining your research questions, sources and approach.
  • Submit your proposal on your host University using their online application form.

Notes on completing the application form for the GPE pathway:

  • In Section 1 enter ‘Global Political Economy: Transformations and Policy Analysis’ next to programme
  • In Section 7 tick UK Research Council
  • Your 1000-word proposal should be included in Section 10
  • All applicants are required to provide two references

Timeline

The deadline for applications for funding for the 2014/15 academic year has now passed. Applicants who have submitted applications for the 2014/15 scholarships competition will be notified whether their application has been successful by the on Friday 28th March 2014. Successful applicants will be expected to start in September 2014.

What does an ESRC studentship cover?

An ESRC studentship covers University tuition fees plus an annual maintenance stipend of around £13,726 to contribute towards living expenses. Each studentship also includes a Research Support Grant of £750 per year to encourage students to attend conferences and additional courses external to the University.

Did you know?

  • Over 90% of our students go into employment or further study
  • More than 2,500 postgraduates join our vibrant international community each year
  • Our ESRC-funded South West Doctoral Training Centre offers world-class research training
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Research

The faculty’s innovative and collaborative research addresses the most pressing social concerns of our globalised society, contributing to significant policy change in many areas.

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