• Launch of world-leading power electronics research centre 1 July 2013 A Centre for Power Electronics that will focus on delivering the underpinning science and engineering behind many low carbon technologies from electric vehicles to renewable energy generation and distribution has been launched thanks to funding of £18 million by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).
  • Bristol professor wins 2013 Martha T Muse Prize 1 July 2013 Professor Martin Siegert has become the first UK-based researcher to win the US$100,000 Muse Prize for Science and Policy in Antarctica. He was commended for his innovative research on Antarctic subglacial lakes and the reconstruction of Antarctic glacial history.
  • New website will help farmers ensure hens maintain good feather cover 1 July 2013 A new website, developed by scientists at the University of Bristol’s School of Veterinary Sciences, has been launched to help make sure laying hens are well-feathered throughout their lives.
  • Humanoid robot that sees and maps 1 July 2013 Computer vision algorithms that enable Samsung’s latest humanoid robot, Roboray, to build real-time 3D visual maps to move around more efficiently have been developed by researchers from the University of Bristol.
  • Dr Martin Poulter appointed Jisc-Wikimedia Ambassador 1 July 2013 Dr Martin Poulter, Senior Web Developer for the University of Bristol’s Economics Network and New Media Manager for the Children of the 90s project, has been appointed Jisc-Wikimedia Ambassador to facilitate a project to bring the academic world and Wikipedia closer together.
  • Sixteen new genetic regions for allergies discovered 30 June 2013 In two of the largest genetic studies ever conducted on common allergies, including pollen, dust-mite and cat allergies, 16 new genetic regions related to the condition have been discovered. Together they are responsible for at least 25 per cent of allergy in the population. Eight of the genetic variations have previously been associated with asthma. The discoveries, published today in Nature Genetics, are a major step towards understanding the biological basis of common allergies.
  • Language staff get on their bikes for charity 28 June 2013 As the likes of Chris Froome and Alberto Contador begin their battle for the cycling’s coveted yellow jersey, four members of University of Bristol staff will be gearing up for their own mini Tour de France to raise money for charity.
  • Female scientists campaign for change in gender inequality in science 28 June 2013 London’s Southbank will be transformed into a hub of scientific learning and discussion next Friday [5 July] as some of the UK’s leading female scientists take to their soapboxes to showcase science to the general public at an event co-founded by a University of Bristol researcher.
  • Exploring dinosaur growth 28 June 2013 Tracking the growth of dinosaurs and how they changed as they grew is difficult. Using a combination of biomechanical analysis and bone histology, palaeontologists from Beijing, Bristol, and Bonn have shown how one of the best-known dinosaurs switched from four feet to two as it grew.
  • Boat noise stops fish finding home 28 June 2013 Boat noise disrupts orientation behaviour in larval coral reef fish, according to new research from the Universities of Bristol, Exeter and Liège. Reef fish are normally attracted by reef sound but the study, conducted in French Polynesia, found that fish are more likely to swim away from recordings of reefs when boat noise is added.
  • £50,000 for Future Documentary project inspired by the Quipu 27 June 2013 A new collaboration between University of Bristol researchers Dr Matthew Brown and Dr Karen Tucker and media company Chaka Films has been awarded £50,000 as part of REACT Future Documentary Sandbox – an AHRC-funded initiative to encourage new forms of storytelling exploring the documentary format, arts and humanities research and digital technologies.
  • Genome of 700,000-year-old horse sequenced 26 June 2013 The oldest genome so far from a prehistoric creature has been sequenced by an international team, led by scientists from the Natural History Museum of Denmark and including Bristol's Dr Jakob Vinther
  • Touchless technology wins £15,000 in New Enterprise Competition 26 June 2013 The futuristic concept of being able to recreate the sensation of touch mid-air has won the University of Bristol’s equivalent to Dragon’s Den and a share of over £30,000 prize money. Ultrahaptics, a novel technology developed by PhD student Tom Carter and Professor Sriram Subramanian, beat a record 75 entries to scoop the top prize in the New Enterprise Competition which was judged by a panel of industry experts.
  • Botanic Garden to take part in Stoke Bishop Open Gardens 26 June 2013 The University of Bristol’s Botanic Garden will be one of nine gardens open for the first Stoke Bishop Open Gardens trail this Sunday [30 June].
  • The Innocent and the Criminal Justice System 26 June 2013 What happens when the criminal justice system convicts an innocent person? That’s the central question posed by University of Bristol academic Michael Naughton in his new book, The Innocent and the Criminal Justice System.
  • New online tool to educate consumers on the cost of their credit cards 26 June 2013 A new website which gives consumers better access to tailored information on their credit card costs is launched today by The UK Cards Association following a research project undertaken with the Personal Finance Research Centre (PFRC) at the University of Bristol.
  • Study highlights need for increased promotion of support groups for men with depression 26 June 2013 GP’s and health professionals need to do more to promote support groups for men suffering with depression and anxiety according to new research published [26 June] in the journal Primary Health Care Research & Development.
  • Researchers find key to blood-clotting process 25 June 2013 Researchers, including Professor Alastair Poole and Dr Matthew Harper from the University of Bristol’s School of Physiology and Pharmacology, have uncovered a key process in understanding how blood clots form that could help pave the way for new therapies to reduce the risk of heart attacks.
  • Professor Mick Aston, 1946-2013 25 June 2013 Professor Mick Aston, Emeritus Professor of Landscape Archaeology at the University of Bristol, a pioneer of landscape archaeology, a prolific author and a tireless campaigner for access to academia, died unexpectedly at his home on Sunday night aged 66.
  • Lady Hale to be next Deputy President of Supreme Court 25 June 2013 The Chancellor of the University of Bristol, the Right Honourable the Baroness Hale of Richmond, has been appointed Deputy President of the Supreme Court, the first women to be appointed to this position.
  • Summer school brings together communication researchers 25 June 2013 Some of the brightest young minds working within the wireless and wired research communities were brought together by the University of Bristol at the start of June [10-14] to facilitate the exchange of ideas and promote scientific learning.
  • Dr Laura Dickinson named UBU Outstanding Teacher 24 June 2013 Dr Laura Dickinson, Senior Associate Teacher in the Queen's School of Engineering, has been awarded the University of Bristol Students’ Union (UBU) Outstanding Teacher Award.
  • Accelerating world-class engineering and science to solve real-world problems 24 June 2013 Awards totalling over £1.2 million, funded through the University’s EPSRC-funded Impact Acceleration Account, have been made across four of the University's Schools to accelerate the impact of research.
  • Bristol celebrates 100 years of teacher education at top of the class 24 June 2013 The University of Bristol is celebrating its hundredth year of teacher education with a free public festival. Hosted by the University’s Graduate School of Education on Friday 28 June, the day of festivities is open to anyone with an interest in education — from teachers and researchers to parents and policymakers.
  • Hope for migraine sufferers? 23 June 2013 In the largest study of migraine ever undertaken, researchers from the UK, the USA, Australia and Europe have found five new genetic regions that, for the first time, have been linked to the onset of migraine. This discovery is a major step forward in the understanding of the causes and biological triggers of migraine attacks.
  • Awards week celebrates wealth of student talent and dedication 21 June 2013 The University of Bristol Students’ Union (UBU) has been celebrating outstanding student achievement this week by holding a series of award nights to honour the students and staff who make a difference.
  • Professor Martin Lowson, 1938-2013 21 June 2013 Professor Martin Lowson, Emeritus Professor of Advanced Transport and former Head of Aerospace Engineering, has died aged 75. Colleagues offer an appreciation of his life and achievements.
  • EPSRC grant for renewable energy project 21 June 2013 A project pursuing new approaches to harvesting thermal energy using nanodiamond has been awarded funding by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.
  • WHO report highlights violence against women as a ‘global health problem of epidemic proportions’ and launches new guidelines for the health sector 20 June 2013 World Health Organisation (WHO) clinical and policy guidelines to help the health sector respond to intimate partner and or sexual violence against women are published today [20 June]. The guidelines, authored by an international group of experts and based on systematic evidence reviews, are published in conjunction with a WHO report that reveals violence against women is a public health problem affecting more than one third of women globally. The guidelines aim to help countries improve their health sectors’ capacity to respond to violence against women.
  • Paralysed with fear: the story of polio 19 June 2013 Thanks to vaccination, polio has been pushed to the brink of extinction – but can we finish the job? This is one of the big questions which a University of Bristol academic, Professor Gareth Williams, addresses in a free talk about his new book next week [Tuesday 25 June].
  • Bristol's Teaching Awards announced 19 June 2013 University of Bristol academics and support staff were honoured at the inaugural Bristol Teaching Awards ceremony held at the Mansion House, Bristol on 17 June 2013.
  • MBE for Dr Eric Albone in Queen's Birthday Honours 19 June 2013 Dr Eric Albone, a Research Associate in the Centre for Public Engagement, has been awarded an MBE for his services to education in the Queen's Birthday Honours.
  • Bristol neuroscientists receive two major funding awards 19 June 2013 Professors David Murphy, from Bristol Neuroscience, and Julian Paton, from of the School of Physiology and Pharmacology, have been awarded two of six research grants funded under a collaborative scheme by Research Councils UK (RCUK) and the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP).
  • 30,000 people to visit Bristol for latest open days 19 June 2013 A record number of visitors will be attending the University of Bristol’s latest undergraduate open days on Wednesday and Thursday [26 and 27 June]. Around 15,000 visitors have booked to attend each day, with both prospective students and their guests wanting a taste of university life and the chance to see for themselves all that the University and city has to offer.
  • What makes people click? 18 June 2013 Academics from the University’s Intelligent Systems Laboratory have analysed tens of thousands of articles available to readers of online news and created a model to find out ‘what makes people click’.
  • Mission Rabies comes to Bristol 18 June 2013 Luke Gamble, a University of Bristol alumni and founder of Worldwide Veterinary Services, visited Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences last Thursday to promote the Mission Rabies project.
  • Ground monitoring equipment is deployed on two Ethiopian volcanoes showing signs of unrest 18 June 2013 Images taken from space have indicated that some of the world’s unmonitored volcanoes may not be as peaceful as we might like to think. Satellite radar has shown that the surfaces of a number of volcanoes within the East African Rift are deforming – inflating and deflating.
  • Moderate drinking during pregnancy study featured in national media 18 June 2013 New research, led by Professor John Macleod from the University’s School of Social and Community Medicine, has found that moderate drinking during pregnancy — three to seven glasses of alcohol a week — does not appear to harm fetal neurodevelopment, as indicated by the child’s ability to balance. The study, published in the journal BMJ Open, has featured in the national media today [18 June].
  • Moderate drinking during pregnancy does not appear to harm child’s balance 17 June 2013 Moderate drinking during pregnancy — three to seven glasses of alcohol a week — does not appear to harm the child’s ability to balance, suggests a large study, led by academics at the University of Bristol and published online in the journal BMJ Open.
  • Is your pet dog using their passport this summer? 17 June 2013 The Great Pet Survey, led by academics in the University of Bristol’s Schools of Veterinary Sciences and Biological Sciences, was launched last year to find out where in the world UK dog owners take their dogs but more owners are needed to take part in the study.
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