• Does plant-based medicine still have a role to play in 21st century healthcare? 22 April 2013 James Wong, who fronted the award-winning BBC Two series Grow Your Own Drugs, will discuss the potential value of traditional medical practices in the age of nanotechnology and stem cell research at a talk organised by the University of Bristol’s Botanic Garden and Cleeve Nursery on Thursday 25 April.
  • Patients with chronic fatigue use additional areas of brain when using memory 22 April 2013 Scientists studying the brain scans of chronic fatigue patients have found they use additional brain regions to do simple tasks requiring attention. This may explain the problems many sufferers have with memory. The findings are just one of several new studies being presented today [22 Apr] at the launch of a new UK-wide research body to advance understanding and treatment into this debilitating condition which affects over 600,000 people in the UK.
  • Engineering research makes front-page news 22 April 2013 An article about pioneering research into energy and CO2 reduction, led by Professor Joe McGeehan in the University's Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, was the front-page story in the Bristol Post.
  • University of Bristol flies the flag in China with inaugural graduation 22 April 2013 The ceremonial centrepiece of Bristol University has been recreated in China, with over 200 students from across the Asian country celebrating their graduation in style.
  • Random walks on DNA 19 April 2013 Scientists have revealed how a bacterial enzyme has evolved an energy-efficient method to move long distances along DNA. The findings, published in Science, present further insight into the coupling of chemical and mechanical energy by a class of enzymes called helicases, a widely-distributed group of proteins, which in human cells are implicated in some cancers.
  • Bristol to provide cutting edge cloud network technology to enhance the fields of telemedicine 19 April 2013 Researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Cardiff will today [Friday 19 April] show how groundbreaking ultra high definition (UHD) technology is making a real difference in remote medical training and diagnosis, with 3D demonstrations on a ‘virtual patient’.
  • Researchers reveal more effective way of testing therapies to treat depression 18 April 2013 Researchers have found a new method for studying depression in rats that mirrors an aspect of the mood-related symptoms of the condition in humans. Until now, the lack of animal models that can replicate the emotional symptoms of psychiatric disorders displayed in humans has been a major obstacle for the development of treatments. It is hoped this new technique, published in Neuropsychopharmacology, will improve the efficacy testing of new therapies.
  • New £743,000 study into whether after-school dance programme helps to increase physical activity and is cost-effective 17 April 2013 Researchers led by principal investigator, Professor Russ Jago in the University of Bristol’s School for Policy Studies have been awarded £743,000 of funding from the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) to conduct a large evaluation of the potential of an after-school dance programme to increase the physical activity of Year 7 girls.
  • Dr Churchill helps women take the lead 16 April 2013 Bristol’s School of Clinical Sciences has appointed Amanda Churchill, Consultant Senior Lecturer in Ophthalmology, to the new role of School Lead for Women in Science.
  • TEDMEDLive comes to Bristol 16 April 2013 Could the quantum computing revolution transform drug development, are there new approaches for improving sleep and do people benefit from being diagnosed with early-stage dementia? These are some of the questions that will be discussed at the first TEDMEDLive Bristol at the MShed on Thursday [18 April].
  • Nanoscopic cages for big applications 15 April 2013 Scientists have developed a new type of nanoparticle with potential applications in chemistry, biology and medicine. The findings, published in Science and led by a multidisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Bristol, could potentially be used to deliver bioactive molecules, such as drugs, to cells and eventually diseased tissues in the body.
  • Conference targets women with complex and multiple needs 15 April 2013 Findings from a two-year study that looked at the experiences of women in the homeless service system will be presented at a national conference, hosted by academics at the University of Bristol, next week [24 April].
  • University of Bristol holds its first graduation celebration in China 15 April 2013 More than 200 students from across China will take part in the first graduation celebration of its kind when the University of Bristol brings a traditional British ceremony to Beijing.
  • New study reveals the true cost of kinship care 15 April 2013 A major study published today [15 April] by leading children’s grant-giving charity, Buttle UK and the University of Bristol provides the most comprehensive picture to date of informal kinship care — children cared for informally by relatives and friends because their parents are no longer able to look after them.
  • Help shape Bristol’s future 12 April 2013 The University of Bristol is recruiting new lay members to join to the University Council and several of its committees.
  • Disappearing nannies force parents to accept their duties 12 April 2013 Large helpers (nannies) in a cichlid fish allow the dominant male and female to reduce their personal contribution to their offspring and territory, according to new research published today in Functional Ecology.
  • Update on capital programme 11 April 2013 Deputy Vice-Chancellor David Clarke provides staff and students with an update on capital building projects across the University.
  • National media coverage on news that donations to universities has hit record high 11 April 2013 Professor Eric Thomas, Vice Chancellor of the University of Bristol and Tania Rawlinson, Director of Campaigns and Alumni Relations at the University and Chair of the Ross Group - a network of higher education fund-raisers, have commented to national media on the results of a fundraising survey in the UK higher education sector.
  • Make a date with Google Calendar 11 April 2013 The second phase of the Google implementation will be taking place this week with the aim that all staff and postgraduate research students will use Google Calendar from Monday 15 April. This will replace the Oracle Calendar service.
  • Dr Tasker receives Petplan Charitable Trust Research Award 10 April 2013 Dr Séverine Tasker from the Bristol Veterinary School has become the 2013 recipient of the Petplan Charitable Trust Research Award, which recognises a person, or team, who has made an outstanding contribution in the field of veterinary research.
  • Findings reveal what factors contribute to outstanding fundraising programmes 10 April 2013 The findings from a year-long study that sought to identify what factors contribute to outstanding fundraising appeals are published this week. The Clayton Burnett-commissioned research, led by academics at the University of Bristol and Indiana University in the US, analysed the leadership, communication and structures behind some of the UK’s most successful fundraising programmes.
  • Student to embark on 3,200 mile cycle challenge across the US 10 April 2013 A University of Bristol student will embark on the challenge of a lifetime when he cycles across North America next month, pushing himself to the limit as he clocks up over 3,000 miles and crosses three mountain ranges in 50 days. Self-confessed ‘bike nut’ Marcus Farnfield, a third year Chemistry student, aims to cycle from Vancouver in Canada to Washington DC on the east coast of the US.
  • Reliability of neuroscience research questioned 10 April 2013 New research has questioned the reliability of neuroscience studies, saying that conclusions could be misleading due to small sample sizes. A team led by academics from the University of Bristol reviewed 48 articles on neuroscience meta-analysis which were published in 2011 and concluded that most had an average power of around 20 per cent – a finding which means the chance of the average study discovering the effect being investigated is only one in five.
  • Professor Guy Nason awarded EPSRC Established Career Fellowship 8 April 2013 Professor Guy Nason in the School of Mathematics has been awarded a prestigious Established Career Fellowship by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).
  • Further potential insight into the complex neuropathology of Down’s syndrome 7 April 2013 Researchers at the University of Bristol have revealed new insight into the function of a key protein attributed to impaired learning and memory in Down’s syndrome. The findings, published online in Nature Cell Biology, offer further molecular insight into how the reduced level of this key protein termed ‘sorting nexin-27’ [SNX27] may contribute to learning and memory problems associated with Down’s syndrome.
  • Students flee from Bristol to Vienna in 36 hours 5 April 2013 An intrepid team of students from the University of Bristol ‘escaped’ 872 miles to Vienna as part of the Jailbreak challenge, which has raised over £7,000 for charity. Wilf Middleton and Leon Luithlen travelled through England, Belgium, Germany and Austria in 36 hours without spending any money to emerge victorious in the RAG event, organised by the University’s Students’ Union (UBU).
  • Bristol researcher comments on proposals to ban pesticides to save bees 5 April 2013 Dr Heather Whitney, from the School of Biological Sciences, has been interviewed by BBC News about the call for pesticides to be banned in light of declining bee numbers.
  • Kind-hearted students transform outlook for residential home 3 April 2013 Students from the University of Bristol have transformed the outlook for residents at a Clifton care home, painting an eye-catching mural to brighten up an otherwise boring wall. Staff at Carlton Mansions, on Apsley Road, already had a good relationship with student volunteers and decided to ask the University of Bristol Students’ Union (UBU) for their help in creating a fun scene.
  • Gmail has arrived 3 April 2013 Over the Easter weekend email for staff and postgraduate research students at the University of Bristol moved to Gmail.
  • Sonic lasso catches cells 3 April 2013 Academics in the University of Bristol’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and the University of Dundee's Institute for Medical Science and Technology have demonstrated for the first time that a “sonic lasso” can be used to grip microscopic objects, such as cells, and move them about.
  • Breadline Britain – special broadcast ITV [28 March] 28 March 2013 The first results from the largest and most authoritative study of poverty and deprivation ever conducted in the UK will be broadcast on ITV at 7.30pm on Thursday 28 March in a special Tonight programme on ‘Breadline Britain’.
  • Largest study into poverty reveals extent of deprivation in the UK 28 March 2013 Today 33 per cent of the UK population suffers from multiple deprivation — it was 14 per cent in 1983, and over 30 million people (almost half the population) are suffering some degree of financial insecurity. These are just some of the stark findings from the largest and most authoritative study of poverty and deprivation ever conducted in the UK.
  • Neuroscientist Jen wins pupils’ votes as science meets the X Factor 28 March 2013 A neuroscientist from the University of Bristol has emerged victorious in a competition which gives science lessons an X Factor makeover. Jen Todd Jones, a PhD student in the School of Experimental Psychology, won the science world’s equivalent of the popular music talent show by answering over 200 questions from inquisitive pupils as part of ‘I’m a Scientist: In the Zone’, an online education event part-funded by the Wellcome Trust.
  • Scientists identify brain’s ‘molecular memory switch’ 28 March 2013 Scientists have identified a key molecule responsible for triggering the chemical processes in our brain linked to our formation of memories. The findings, published in the journal Frontiers in Neural Circuits, reveal a new target for therapeutic interventions to reverse the devastating effects of memory loss.
  • Engineering students find all the fun of the Faire 27 March 2013 A team of students from the Faculty of Engineering took part in Bristol's first Mini Maker Faire at the MShed last weekend [23 March].
  • Driftwood foal trots into the Botanic Garden for Easter 27 March 2013 The University of Bristol Botanic Garden Easter sculpture exhibition will take place from Good Friday [29 March] to Easter Monday [April 1].
  • How do we know what colour dinosaur feathers were? 27 March 2013 How do we know what colour dinosaur feathers were? Paleontologists are one step closer to solving this long-standing mystery thanks to recreating the fossilisation process to see what effect high pressure and temperatures have on the colour of feathers.
  • Women, the Arts and Globalization 27 March 2013 The first anthology to specifically explore the relationships between transnational feminism and women's art practices across a range of contemporary media, co-edited by Dr Dorothy Rowe in the Department of History of Art, is published this month.
  • Seeing happiness in ambiguous facial expressions reduces aggressive behaviour 27 March 2013 Encouraging young people at high-risk of criminal offending and delinquency to see happiness rather than anger in facial expressions results in a decrease in their levels of anger and aggression, new research from the University of Bristol has found.
  • High-tech scan for 320 million-year-old fossil 26 March 2013 A 320 million-year-old fossilised skull – found in Newsham, Blyth in Northumberland in the 18th century by a local grocer – has undergone state-of-the-art CT scanning by a University of Bristol researcher at Newcastle's Freeman Hospital.
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