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Dr Jose Lingna Nafafe

Lusophone Atlantic African diaspora, seventeenth and eighteenth century Portuguese and Brazilian history

Dr Lingna Nafafé’s academic interests embrace a number of inter-related areas, linked by the overarching themes of: Lusophone Atlantic African diaspora, seventeenth and eighteenth century Portuguese and Brazilian history; slavery and wage-labour, 1792-1850; race, religion and ethnicity; Luso-African migrants’ culture and integration in the Northern (England) and Southern Europe (Portugal and Spain); ‘Europe in Africa’ and ‘Africa in Europe’; and the relationship between postcolonial theory and the Lusophone Atlantic.

Dr Lingna Nafafé has been awarded a two-year British Academy Small Grant to undertake a research project on the integration of African migrants in Northern and Southern Europe. The project investigates how migrants from Angola, Cape Verde and Guinea-Bissau use bonding, bridging and linking social capital to find employment and achieve social mobility in the labour market. The research will be carried out in Birmingham, Madrid and Lisbon. It will address issues that are of vital importance to European society such as the integration of migrants, and migrants’ own understandings of the integration process.

Dr Lingna Nafafé has received invitations to share research findings with the following:

  • All-Party Parliamentary group on Guinea-Bissau
  • Vatican Radio in Rome
  • USA State Department
  • Guinea-Bissau National Television
  • Foreign and Commonwealth Office
  • Mosaic Producciones for France TV and RTP Portugal

He is currently writing a second book on: Beyond Wilberforce’s Experiment in Abolitionism: Unfree Labour and the Market.

Dr Lingna Nafafé sits on the advisory board of the Cadernos de Estudos Africanos, the most prestigious Portuguese peer-review academic journal on African Studies.

Research keywords

  • Lusophone Atlantic African diaspora seventeenth and eighteenth century Portuguese and Brazilian history
  • slavery and wage-labour 1792-1850
  • race and slavery
  • Luso-African migrants’ culture and integration in the Northern (England) and Southern Europe (Portugal and Spain)
  • ‘Europe in Africa’ and ‘Africa in Europe’
  • Relationship between postcolonial theory and the Lusophone Atlantic.