Browse/search for people

Dr Anna Pease

Dr Anna Pease

Dr Anna Pease

CVI Project Lead and Senior Research Associate

Senior Research Associate

Area of research

Oto Acoustic Signals Investigation Study (OASIS) and The CVI Project

Office OH BF1
Oakfield House,
Oakfield Grove, Clifton BS8 2BN
(See a map)

+44 (0) 117 33 13310

Summary

I have recently completed my PhD at the University of Bristol, which investigated the decision-making processes of mothers with young babies from deprived backgrounds, in relation to the risk factors for SIDS. I am now working on two new projects: the OASIS Study and the CVI Project.

OASIS

The Oto Acoustic Signals Investigation Study (OASIS) is an innovative new study which could lead to identifying babies and young children at risk of sudden, unexpected deaths, by examining data from the newborn hearing screen.

If the results of this initial study prove conclusive, this could have potentially ground-breaking implications for the prevention of SIDS and unexpected deaths of older children in the future.

The study will investigate whether any feature of the routinely collected newborn hearing screen, either alone or in combination with other risk factors, can be used to identify infants at increased risk of unexpected death in infancy.

The design also means that the proposed study will be the first case-control study of unexpected infants deaths in England since the end of SWISS study in 2007, and will provide important information about the current risk factors for SIDS.

The CVI Project

Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI) refers to impairment of vision due to malfunction of the brain, rather than the eyes. CVI is a feature of many neurodevelopmental conditions, affects an estimated 1% of children and results in learning, co-ordination and communication difficulties.

Descriptive studies report that simplifying visual input improves performance in children with CVI but robust data are lacking. CVI is often unrecognised as many affected children have good visual acuity and appear to “see” normally. 

The program of work involves refining and evaluating a complex intervention, involving school and hospital components, for children with CVI. 

Personal details

I am originally from the North East of England, but grew up in Scotland. I have an MA in Applied Psychology and an MSc in Health Psychology as well as a PhD. I have previously worked in New Zealand on national strategies to reduce the incidence of unexpected infant deaths, particularly in Maori communities. I have also worked in Southampton developing the Healthy Conversation Skills training (RCT) to evaluate the effectiveness of brief motivational interventions on mothers diet and physical activity. 

I am married to Joshua and we have a daughter, Eve who is 4. I have worked, travelled and lived in quite a few other countries, including Brazil, The United States, New Zealand, Vietnam and Malaysia.

PhD Research

Factors Influencing Infant Care Practices in the Sleep Environment amongst Families at High Risk of SIDS

To advise parents (especially those at higher risk of SIDS) on whether and in what conditions they should or should not sleep with their infants we need to understand some of the factors that influence their decision-making process on how they sleep, feed and care for their infant. The purpose of this research was to begin to understand these processes and the relationship between breastfeeding and co-sleeping. This understanding will provide a basis for advice that aims to keep infants safe while they sleep without undermining the parents’ ability to breastfeed. The research also investigated other risk factors associated with SIDS, in particular swaddling, dummy use,  sleepi ng position and how the bedclothes are arranged and looked at how these practices are affected when there is a change in the normal routine.   

This research hopes to advance our knowledge of how parental decisions and associated behaviours can contribute to the safety of sleeping babies.

The work is funded by The Lullaby Trust, a charity that promotes expert advice on safer baby sleep and provides special support for anyone bereaved through Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

Biography

I am originally from the North East of England, but grew up in Scotland. I have an MA in Applied Psychology and an MSc in Health Psychology. I have previously worked in New Zealand on national strategies to reduce the incidence of unexpected infant deaths, particularly in Maori communities. I have also worked in Southampton developing the Healthy Conversation Skills training (RCT) to asses the effectiveness of brief motivational interventions on mothers diet and physical activity. I am currently a PhD Student at the University of Bristol investigating the decision-making processes of mothers with young babies from deprived backgrounds, in relation to the risk factors for SIDS.

I am married to Joshua and we have a daughter, Eve who is 2. I have worked, travelled and lived in quite a few other countries, including Brazil, The United States, New Zealand, Vietnam and Malaysia.

Publications:

1.      Pease AS, Fleming PJ, Hauck FR, et al. Swaddling and the Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: A Meta-analysis. Pediatrics 2016: e20153275.

2.      Knipe DW, Carroll R, Thomas KH, Pease A, Gunnell D, Metcalfe C. Association of socio-economic position and suicide/attempted suicide in low and           middle income countries in South and South-East Asia - a systematic review. BMC Public Health 2015; 15(1): 1055.

3.      Fleming PJ, Blair PS, Pease A. Sudden unexpected death in infancy: aetiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology and prevention in 2015. Arch Dis               Child 2015; 100(10): 984-8.

4.      Fleming P, Pease A, Blair P. Bed-sharing and unexpected infant deaths: what is the relationship? Paediatr Respir Rev 2015; 16(1): 62-7.

5.      Lawrence W, Black C, Tinati T, et al. 'Making every contact count': Evaluation of the impact of an intervention to train health and social care                   practitioners in skills to support health behaviour change. J Health Psychol 2014.

6.      Blair PS, Sidebotham P, Pease A, Fleming PJ. Bed-sharing in the absence of hazardous circumstances: is there a risk of sudden infant death                     syndrome? An analysis from two case-control studies conducted in the UK. PLoS One 2014; 9(9): e107799.

7.      Cowan S, Pease A, Bennett S. Usage and impact of an online education tool for preventing sudden unexpected death in infancy. Journal of                       paediatrics and child health 2013; 49(3): 228-32.

8.      Cowan S, Bennett S, Clarke J, Pease A. An evaluation of portable sleeping spaces for babies following the Christchurch earthquake of February 2011.          Journal of paediatrics and child health 2013; 49(5): 364-8.

9.      Tinati T, Lawrence W, Ntani G, et al. Implementation of new Healthy Conversation Skills to support lifestyle changes - what helps and what hinders?          Experiences of Sure Start Children's Centre staff. Health Soc Care Community 2012; 20(4): 430-7.

10.   Jarman M, Lawrence W, Ntani G, et al. Low levels of food involvement and negative affect reduce the quality of diet in women of lower educational          attainment. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics 2012; 25(5): 444-52.

11.   Jarman M, Pease AS, Lawrence W, Barker M. Why do women of lower educational attainment have lower food involvement than women of higher              educational attainment? Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 2010; 69(OCE1): null-null.

12.    Cowan S, Pease A. 6 + 1: a child survival pilot project. Journal of paediatrics and child health 2008; 44(11): 677.

 

 

Keywords

  • SIDS
  • breastfeeding
  • co-sleeping
  • bed-sharing
  • infant care
  • parenting
  • decision-making Vision
  • children
  • evaluation
  • Feasibility RCTs

Skills

  • SIDS Cerebral Visual Impairment

Methodologies

  • Qualitative interviews
  • surveys
  • Case control
  • feasibility RCTs

Memberships

Organisations

Bristol Medical School (PHS)

Centres, collaborations and units

Recent publications

View complete publications list in the University of Bristol publications system

Edit this profile If you are Dr Anna Pease, you can edit this page. Login required.

PDF versionDownload PDF