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Publication - Dr Jeremy Horwood

    Recommendations for conducting invasive urodynamics for men with lower urinary tract symptoms

    Qualitative interview findings from a large randomized controlled trial (UPSTREAM)

    Citation

    Selman, L, Ochieng, C, Lewis, A, Drake, M & Horwood, J, 2019, ‘Recommendations for conducting invasive urodynamics for men with lower urinary tract symptoms: Qualitative interview findings from a large randomized controlled trial (UPSTREAM)’. Neurourology and Urodynamics, vol 38., pp. 320-329

    Abstract

    AIMS: To capture in-depth qualitative evidence regarding attitudes to and experiences of urodynamic testing among men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) at each end of the clinical pathway.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interview study conducted within the Urodynamics for Prostate Surgery: Randomized Evaluation of Assessment Methods (UPSTREAM) trial, which randomized men to a care pathway including urodynamics or routine non-invasive tests from 26 secondary care urology sites across England. Men were interviewed after assessments but prior to treatment, or after surgery for LUTS. Men were purposively sampled to include those who had urodynamics and those who did not, and diversity in demographic characteristics and symptom burden. Interviews were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis.

    RESULTS: Forty-one men participated (25 pre-treatment, 16 post-surgery), ages 52-89. The 16 men who had not previously experienced urodynamics said they would accept the test in their assessment, but some were apprehensive or wanted more information. The 25 men who had experienced urodynamics all found it acceptable, though some reported pain, infection, or embarrassment. Embarrassment was minimized by informing patients what the procedure would be like, and ensuring privacy. Urodynamics was valued for its perceived diagnostic insight. Information deficits were reported before, during, and after the test. How and when results were explained and the adequacy of explanations varied.

    CONCLUSIONS: Urodynamics is acceptable to men with LUTS and generally well-tolerated. To ensure patients are prepared and informed, good communication before and during the procedure is essential. Privacy should be prioritized, and test results discussed promptly and in sufficient detail. Staff require training and guidance in these areas.

    Full details in the University publications repository