Dr Melanie Griffiths

Dr Melanie Griffiths

Dr Melanie Griffiths
Senior Research Associate

1.06, 3 Priory Road,
11 Priory Road, Clifton, Bristol
BS8 1TU
(See a map)

melanie.griffiths@bristol.ac.uk

Telephone Number (0117) 331 0852

School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies

Deportability and the Family: Migrant Men's Negotiations of the Right to Respect for Family Life

Personal profile

Melanie has been Principal Investigator on an ESRC Future Research Leaders grant since January 2014. The project, entitled Detention, Deportability and the Family: Migrant Men's Negotiations of the Right to Respect for Family Life, is on the family lives and Article 8 rights of men at risk of deportation, and is being mentored by Professor Tariq Modood and Dr Katharine Charsley. Grant number ES/K009370/1. She is currently a visiting scholar at the University of Amsterdam, jointly hosted by the Institute for Ethnic and Migration Studies, and Amsterdam Research Center on Gender and Sexuality. 

In 2013, Melanie spent nine months as an Associate Research Fellow at the University of Exeter, working with Dr Nick Gill on an ESRC-funded project looking at disparities between asylum appeals heard at Tribunal hearing centres across England and Wales. This post involved three months of intensive ethnographic observation of asylum appeals (First-Tier, Upper Tribunal and Detained Fast Track).

Melanie's doctoral research was conducted at the University of Oxford, in association with COMPAS and the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology. The thesis considered the asylum system in the UK, focusing particularly on refused asylum seekers and immigration detainees. Entitled ‘Who is Who Now?’ Truth, Trust and Identification in the British Asylum and Immigration Detention System, it was supervised by Professor Marcus Banks and examined by Professors Tony Good and Mary Bosworth. It considers the role and negotiation of identification requirements in the asylum system. Melanie has also written on time, uncertainty, masculinity and bureaucratic relations in the migration field.

Research

Group

Candice Morgan

Teaching

I am sometimes involved in the running of the undergraduate Sociology modules ‘Gender and Migration’ (final-year module) and ‘Social Identities and Divisions’ (first-year core module). I also supervise undergraduate and MSc students writing dissertations.




Latest publications

  1. Griffiths, M, 2017, ‘Foreign, criminal: doubly damned modern British folk-devil’. Citizenship Studies, vol 21., pp. 527-546
  2. Griffiths, M, 2017, ‘Seeking asylum and the politics of family’. Families, Relationships and Societies, vol 6., pp. 153-156
  3. Griffiths, M, 2017, ‘The changing politics of time in the UK’s immigration system’. in: E Mavroudi, A Christou, B Page (eds) Timespace and International Migration. Edward Elgar
  4. Gill, N, Rotter, R, Burridge, A, Allsopp, J & Griffiths, M, 2016, ‘Linguistic incomprehension in British asylum appeal hearings’. Anthropology Today, vol 32., pp. 18-21
  5. Griffiths, M, 2016, ‘Blog post: Invisible fathers of immigration detention in the UK’. Open Democracy
  6. Griffiths, M, 2016, ‘Blog post: Love, Legality and Masculinity. Themed week on Masculinities’. BorderCriminologies
  7. Griffiths, M, 2016, ‘Blog post: Boundary Making and the Broad Ripples of Immigration Enforcement’. COMPAS
  8. Griffiths, M, 2016, ‘Book review: Bosworth, M. (2014). Inside Immigration Detention: foreigners in a carceral age, Oxford: Oxford University Press’. Journal of Refugee Studies, vol 29., pp. 425-427
  9. Griffiths, M, 2015, ‘‘A Proud Tradition’? Immigration detention in the United Kingdom’. in: A Nethery, Stephanie Silverman (eds) Immigration Detention: The migration of a policy and its human impact. Routledge:London
  10. Gill, N, Griffiths, M, Rotter, R, Burridge, A & Allsopp, J, 2015, ‘Inconsistency in asylum appeal adjudication’. Forced Migration Review, vol 50.

Full publications list in the University of Bristol publications system

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