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Publication - Dr Fernando Sanchez-Vizcaino Buendia

    Association of chronic enteropathy activity index, blood urea concentration, and risk of death in dogs with protein-losing enteropathy

    Citation

    Kathrani, A, Sánchez-Vizcaíno, F & Hall, EJ, 2019, ‘Association of chronic enteropathy activity index, blood urea concentration, and risk of death in dogs with protein-losing enteropathy’. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, vol 33., pp. 536-543

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Malnutrition is associated with increased risk of premature death in humans with inflammatory bowel disease.

    HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVE: To determine if historical, clinical, and laboratory markers of malnutrition in dogs at the time of histologic diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) caused by chronic enteropathy (CE) or lymphangiectasia are associated with increased risk of death.

    ANIMALS: Seventy-one client-owned dogs diagnosed with PLE.

    METHODS: The medical records were retrospectively searched for cases of PLE, diagnosed with CE or lymphangiectasia on the basis of histopathology of intestinal biopsies at a referral hospital. For each case, various variables at the time of diagnostic investigation were recorded and follow-up obtained by telephone contact with the referring veterinarian.

    RESULTS: A multivariable cox model indicated that canine chronic enteropathy activity index (CCEAI) and blood urea concentration were significantly associated with death (P values <.01). For each unit increase in CCEAI, the hazard of death increased by 22.9% (confidence interval [CI]: 6.9%-41.2%). Dogs with a CCEAI of ≤8 and dogs with urea ≤7 mmol/L survived 256 days longer (P = .001, CI: 106.7-405.4 days) and 279 days longer (P = .009, CI: 70.0-488.7 days) than those with a CCEAI of >8 and urea >7 mmol/L on average, respectively, when followed up for 647 days.

    CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Increased CCEAI and blood urea concentration at the time of diagnosis might be predictive of death in dogs with PLE caused by CE or lymphangiectasia.

    Full details in the University publications repository