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Unit information: Foreign Policy Analysis in 2021/22

Please note: It is possible that the information shown for future academic years may change due to developments in the relevant academic field. Optional unit availability varies depending on both staffing, student choice and timetabling constraints.

Unit name Foreign Policy Analysis
Unit code POLIM3017
Credit points 20
Level of study M/7
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 2 (weeks 13 - 24)
Unit director Professor. Edmunds
Open unit status Not open
Pre-requisites

None

Co-requisites

None

School/department School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies
Faculty Faculty of Social Sciences and Law

Description

This unit examines the nature of foreign policy and the processes involved in the formulation of foreign policy. It has two main aims. The first is to establish a comparative framework that will reveal the differences as well as the similarities in the foreign policy processes of states across the globe. The second is to evaluate the debates in the literature about the theory and practice of foreign policy: how foreign policy is made and how foreign policy should be made. The foreign policy process in the United States will frequently be drawn upon for illustrative purposes. But the intention is to build a framework that will reveal the differences as well as the similarities in the foreign policy processes of states across the globe. This unit is only available to students registered for MSc/Diploma degrees in the Department of Politics. Please note that the Department does not permit the auditing of any of its units.

This unit aims to:

  • identify the distinguishing characteristics of foreign policy.
  • provide a framework designed to show how foreign policy is made.
  • account for the political and academic debates about the formation of foreign policy.

Intended learning outcomes

On completion the student shall have:

  • An understanding of the distinguishing characteristics of foreign policy.
  • An understanding of how foreign policy is made.
  • A knowledge of the political and academic debates about the formation of foreign poicy.
  • An ability to work collaboratively to give an oral presentation.
  • An ability to make a clear and concise oral presentation.
  • An ability to search out and select relevant material related to the foreign policy formation.
  • An ability to discuss the formation of foreign policy of a state clearly and concisely in an essay.

Teaching details

The unit will be taught through blended learning methods, including a mix of synchronous and asynchronous teaching activities

Assessment Details

Formative assessment: an oral presentation supported by a handout Summative assessment: a 4,000 word essay

A full statement of the relationship between the programme outcomes and types/methods of assessment is contained in accompanying Programme Specifications and section B7 of the Major Change to Current Programme forms for the programmes of which this unit is a part. The assessment for each unit is designed to fit within and contribute to that approach in terms of intellectual development across each of the two teaching blocks, and in relation to knowledge and understanding, intellectual skills and attributes, and transferable skills.

Reading and References

  • L. Eden,‘The End of US Cold War History’ International Security 1993, 174-207.
  • C. Hermann, C. Kegley & J. Rosenau, New Directions in the Study of Foreign Policy 1987.
  • C. Hill, The Changing Politics of Foreign Policy Ch 1, 2.
  • F.S. Northedge, The Foreign Policies of the Powers Ch.1.
  • C.W. Kegley & E.R. Wittkopf American Foreign Policy Ch 1&2.
  • R. Little & M. Smith, Perspectives on World Politics(1.4, 2.3).

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