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Unit information: Professional Studies A - The Commercial, Economic and Management Context of Engineering Processes in 2016/17

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Unit name Professional Studies A - The Commercial, Economic and Management Context of Engineering Processes
Unit code CENG20004
Credit points 10
Level of study I/5
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 1 (weeks 1 - 12)
Unit director Dr. Wanous
Open unit status Not open
Pre-requisites

None

Co-requisites

None

School/department Department of Civil Engineering
Faculty Faculty of Engineering

Description

This unit is designed to provide a number of the generic (core) learning outcomes required for accreditation of engineering programmes under the new UK-SPEC. Specifically, it will explore the commercial, social, legal, environmental and economic context of engineering processes, and management techniques which may be used to ensure such processes achieve their objectives within that context. The unit will cover the environment within which engineering activities take place and the need for engineering-based organisations to develop business strategies in such an environment. The important of an ethical approach to engineering will be stressed, as will health and safety and the legal framework in which engineers operate. Principles of accounting and analysis of company performance will be covered, as will relevant management techniques, including project management, value management and decision-making.

Aims:

The aim of this unit is to give students an understanding of the commercial and economic context of engineering processes, and based on these to introduce (i) key concepts important to the professional practice of engineering and (ii) management techniques which may be used to ensure such processes achieve their objectives within that context.

Intended learning outcomes

On completion, students should be able to:

  1. take responsibility of their personal and professional development;
  2. explain the importance of developing employability-related transferable skills;
  3. appreciate the management role of an engineer within a business and the need to be able to collaborate with other professionals such as marketing, legal, finance and HR;
  4. describe the economic, social and legal context of engineering and the role of different stakeholders in that context;
  5. analyse various organisational strategies, structures and cultures;
  6. describe basic principles of operations and project management and teamwork;
  7. describe basic marketing and economics techniques
  8. explain sustainability as viewed within a business including metrics and in its wider context ;
  9. describe how ethical issues arise in practical engineering situations;
  10. analyse how health and safety risks can be identified and assessed using techniques such as the Health & Safety Executive 5-steps model;
  11. describe the basic legal and professional responsibilities of engineers for safety, health and the environment.

Teaching details

Lectures

Assessment Details

Personal and Professional Development Plan 15% (ILO 1,2 & 3)

Multiple-choice exam, 2 hours 60% (ILO 3-11)

Five computer marked exams during the course 25% (ILO 3-11)

Reading and References

  • Chang, C. M. (2005). Engineering Management: Challenges in the New Millennium. Pearson Education Inc. USA.
  • Campbell, D. and Craig, T. (2005). Organisation and the Business Environment. 2nd Edition. Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann.
  • http://www.amazon.co.uk/Organisations-Business-Environment-David-Campbell/dp/0750658290
  • Stewart, D. M. (1999). 'Handbook of Management Skills'. 3rd Edition. Gowar.
  • Cutts, M. (1999). 'Plain English Guide'. Oxford University Press.
  • Rice, A. (1999). 'Accounts Demystified'. Pitman. 2nd Edition. 1999.
  • The Economist www.economist.com
  • Warren, R. (1998). 'How to understand and use accounts', 4th edition, Hutchinson Business.
  • Bucciarelli, L. L. (2008). 'Ethics and engineering education', European Journal of Engineering Education, Vol. 33, No. 2, 141 149.
  • Davis, M. (ed) (2005). 'Engineering ethics'. Ashgate.
  • Oakland, J. S. (1999). 'Total Quality Management', 2nd edition, Butterworth-Heinemann

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