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Unit information: Growth, Trade and Structural Change in 2016/17

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Unit name Growth, Trade and Structural Change
Unit code ECONM3002
Credit points 15
Level of study M/7
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 2 (weeks 13 - 24)
Unit director Mr. Jahir Islam
Open unit status Not open
Pre-requisites

None

Co-requisites

None

School/department School of Economics, Finance and Management
Faculty Faculty of Social Sciences and Law

Description

This unit provides an introduction to theoretical and empirical research on economic growth in developing countries. The precise content will tend to vary from year to year, but topics covered are likely to include standard growth models, growth accounting, trade policy, structural change, government policy, and growth in East Asia. Students will also be expected to gain a good understanding of the empirical methods used to study economic growth, and the strengths and weaknesses of the available evidence.

Intended learning outcomes

The course will aim to improve the ability of students to analyze and discuss complex issues, and to think critically about evidence and policy recommendations. Students will also be encouraged to study some of the formal models used in the analysis of growth and structural change.

Teaching details

Lectures and five hours of classes

Assessment Details

Formative assessment: one essay that seeks to test and improve the ability of students to draw on a range of references, to analyze and discuss complex issues, to set out relevant formal models, and to think critically about the relevant theory and evidence.

Summative assessment: 100% 3-hour written exam. There will be three essay questions to be selected from a range of topics. These will test the ability of students to prepare and revise material related to the essay topics, to draw on a range of references, to analyze and discuss complex issues, to set out relevant formal models, and to think critically about the relevant theory and evidence.

Reading and References

  • Easterly, William (2001). The Elusive Quest for Growth. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Helpman, E. (2006). The Mystery of Economic Growth. Belknap, Harvard, Cambridge, MA.
  • Mankiw, N. Gregory, Romer, David and Weil, David N. (1992). A contribution to the empirics of economic growth. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 107(2), 407-437.
  • Romer, David (2001). Advanced Macroeconomics (2nd edition.)

Temple, Jonathan (1999). The new growth evidence. Journal of Economic *Literature, March, 37(1), 112-156. Weil, David (2008). Economic Growth (second edition). Addison-Wesley.

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