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Unit information: Musculoskeletal Diseases, Emergency Medicine and Ophthalmology in 2016/17

Please note: you are viewing unit and programme information for a past academic year. Please see the current academic year for up to date information.

Unit name Musculoskeletal Diseases, Emergency Medicine and Ophthalmology
Unit code MEDI23140
Credit points 0
Level of study I/5
Teaching block(s) Academic Year (weeks 1 - 52)
Unit director Dr. Emma Clark
Open unit status Not open
Pre-requisites

Must have progressed from previous year of the MB ChB Programme

Co-requisites

None

School/department Bristol Medical School
Faculty Faculty of Health Sciences

Description

This is a joint Unit that combines Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Trauma teaching with attachments to Emergency Medicine and Ophthalmology.

Intended learning outcomes

Educational Aims and Objectives for Musculoskeletal Medicine & Surgery

At the conclusion of the course, students will:

  • Know the basic anatomy of the musculoskeletal system and surgical approaches -osteology - structure of major joints - anatomy of common injuries - periarticular soft tissues - neurology of limbs.
  • Have a general knowledge of the pathogenesis, clinical features and management of common disorders in rheumatology and orthopaedics including:.
  • Know how to approach the management of patients with common musculoskeletal problems.
  • Understand the principles of diagnosis and management of common fractures and dislocations and major trauma
  • At the conclusion of the course, students must be able to recognise, assess and take immediate appropriate action for the safety of patients suffering severe trauma, limb ischaemia, spinal cord compression, possible spinal fracture and bone or joint infection.
  • Take a relevant history from a person with an acute or chronic musculoskeletal disorder.
  • Use an appropriate technique to examine the various regions of the musculoskeletal system, eliciting commonly observed signs.
  • Control bleeding, suture a wound and apply bandages, simple splints and plaster casts.
  • Read an X-ray sufficiently well to identify major musculoskeletal pathology.

Educational Aims and Objectives for Emergency Medicine

By the end of the attachment, students should be able to:

  • define normal physiological parameters
  • understand the significance of abnormal observations in the recognition of a critically unwell patient
  • define ABC approach in the context of an acutely unwell patient
  • be able to decide when to use a ‘focussed history and examination’ and when to opt for the ‘ABC approach’
  • be able to assess a critically ill or injured patient using a structured ‘ABC approach’

Educational Aims and Objectives for Ophthalmology

At the end of the attachment the student will have acquired a knowledge and understanding of the diagnosis, clinical features and management of common disorders in ophthalmology, specifically:

  • Emergency Ophthalmology
  • Strabismus in children
  • Cataract, including the care pathway followed by a patient undergoing surgery
  • Diabetic retinopathy
  • Age-related disease

Educational Aims and Objectives for Primary Care

  • To see patients with a variety of problems in the surgery or patient’s own home
  • To practice complete and focused history taking and examination
  • To practice formulating and testing differential diagnoses
  • To practice planning investigations, making management plans and prescribing
  • To consult with patients who have chronic diseases and complex problems
  • To observe and reflect on how social and psychological factors interact with physical illness
  • To learn about and reflect on the interface between primary and secondary care

Teaching details

Students are now immersed in the NHS, their learning experiences are spread through a range of clinics, wards, theatres and other spaces, and they will learn from many different teachers. Their activities are drawn together through a weekly Unit Tutorial.

Assessment Details

Summative Assessment of clinical skills (occurring at the end of the Unit):

There are five sections to this clinical component:

  • Musculoskeletal clinical exam comprising o History taking (25% of MDEMO clinical component mark) o Clinical examination (25% of MDEMO clinical component mark) o Clinical reasoning (comprising 30% of MDEMO clinical component mark)
  • Emergency medicine station (10% of MDEMO clinical component mark)
  • Ophthalmology station (10% of MDEMO clinical component mark)

Summative Written occurring at the end of the year

· Comprising 120 ‘best-of-5’ multiple choice questions; of which 80 will be relevant to JMS and 40 will be relevant to MDEM

Formative Assessment: consists of an iSSC with two sub-components: of a case report written to a series of guidelines and marked within the Academy; and a poster produced via team-working within your firm.

Reading and References

Library link

https://www.ole.bris.ac.uk/webapps/cmsmain/webui/_xy-136348_5-t_hYyAB8mF

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