Skip to main content

Unit information: The Resurgence of Antisemitism in the 21st century in 2016/17

Please note: you are viewing unit and programme information for a past academic year. Please see the current academic year for up to date information.

Unit name The Resurgence of Antisemitism in the 21st century
Unit code THRS30150
Credit points 20
Level of study H/6
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 1 (weeks 1 - 12)
Unit director Dr. Campbell
Open unit status Not open
Pre-requisites

None

Co-requisites

None

School/department Department of Religion and Theology
Faculty Faculty of Arts

Description

In recent years, some have warned of the emergence of a 'New Antisemitism', fuelled in part by speculation about a 'Jewish lobby' and portrayals of the State of Israel in the media and academia, which has resulted in verbal and physical attacks against Jewish persons and property in Europe. Others have countered that the existence of such a 'New Antisemitism' is doubtful and, more particularly, that simple opposition to 'Zionism' cannot rightly be classed as antisemitic. After briefly considering antisemitism through the ages, the ideology of the Zionist movement, and the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict by way of background, this unit critically assesses arguments for and against the existence of such a 'New Antisemitism'. To that end, it concentrates on recent British and European discourse about the Jews, Judaism, and Israel in academia and the media, focusing on several specific examples that are subjected to a critical close reading.

Aims:

This unit aims to provide students with the means to gaining:

(1) an accurate background overview of antisemitism, Zionism, and the Arab-Israel conflict;

(2) a critical understanding of recent arguments for and against the emergence of a new antisemitism;

(3) experience of close critical reading of key primary texts pertaining to this ongoing debate.

It also aims to:

(4) provide appropriate opportunities to develop skills in critical thinking and in written and oral communication.

Intended learning outcomes

By the end of the unit, students will be expected to be able to demonstrate that they have:

(1) acquired an accurate background grasp of antisemitism, Zionism, and the Arab-Israel conflict;

(2) a critical understanding of recent arguments for and against the emergence of a new antisemitism;

(3) engaged critically with a close reading of key primary texts pertaining to this ongoing debate.

Students will also be expected to show:

(4) skills in critical thinking and in written and oral communication appropriate to level H.

Teaching details

Seminars - 3 hours per week

Assessment Details

One summative coursework essay of 3000 words (50%) and one unseen examination of two hours comprising 2 questions out of 6 (50%).

Reading and References

  • S. Beller, Antisemitism: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford: OUP, 2007);
  • P. Iganski & B. Kosmin, A New Antisemitism?: Debating Judeophobia in Twenty-first Century Britain (London: Profile Books, 2003);
  • N. De Lange, Modern Judaism: An Oxford Guide (Oxford: OUP, 2005);
  • D.E. Long, B. Reich & M. Gasiorowski, The Government & Politics of the Middle East & North Africa (Boulder CO: Westview Press, 2010);
  • E. Said, The Question of Palestine (New York: Random, 2003);
  • B. Winkler, Antisemitism: Summary Overview of the Situation in the European Union 2001-5 - Working Paper (Vienna: EUMC, 2006)

Feedback