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Unit information: Organisations and Incentives in 2020/21

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Unit name Organisations and Incentives
Unit code EFIMM0106
Credit points 15
Level of study M/7
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 2 (weeks 13 - 24)
Unit director Dr. Maija Halonen-Akatwijuka
Open unit status Not open
Pre-requisites

TB1 Economics

Co-requisites

None

School/department School of Economics
Faculty Faculty of Social Sciences and Law

Description

This unit examines how compensation and organisational design affect incentives and productivity in organisations. The following questions are addressed.

How does compensation affect performance and recruitment?

What are the benefits and costs of team work?

When should decision making be decentralised?

What is the effect of advances in IT on organisational design?

How does prosocial behaviour affect incentives in organisations?

We study economic theory of incentives and its empirical evidence. We also apply the principles arising from the theory to real-world case studies. This enables the students to learn skills that are valuable in their future careers in management positions.

The aims of this unit are to

(1) study economic theory of incentives and its empirical evidence.

(2) apply the principles arising from the theory to real-world case studies.

Intended learning outcomes

On completion of the unit students will be able to (1) recognise the importance of compensation and organisational design to productivity of organisations, (2) outline the main theories of incentives pay and organisational design, (3) apply economic models in a relevant way to organisational issues, (4) recognise the strengths and limits of economic modelling of organisations and (5) have gained experience in team work.

Teaching details

Teaching will be delivered through a combination of synchronous and asynchronous sessions such as online teaching for large and small group, face-to-face small group classes (where possible) and interactive learning activities

Assessment Details

Coursework 1 (50%)

Coursework 2 (50%)

Reading and References

Gibbons, R. and J. Roberts (eds) (2013) The Handbook of Organizational Economics, Princeton University Press.

Kuhn, P. (2017) Personnel Economics, Oxford University Press.

Lazear E. and M. Gibbs (2014) Personnel Economics in Practice, 3rd edition, Wiley.

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