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Unit information: Mathematics 1ES in 2013/14

Please note: you are viewing unit and programme information for a past academic year. Please see the current academic year for up to date information.

Unit name Mathematics 1ES
Unit code MATH10500
Credit points 40
Level of study C/4
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 4 (weeks 1-24)
Unit director Dr. Chenchiah
Open unit status Open
Pre-requisites

GCSE in Mathematics at Grade C or equivalent.

Co-requisites

None

School/department School of Mathematics
Faculty Faculty of Science

Description

This unit provides a first course in calculus, algebra and statistics. It is designed to be suitable for first year science students with only GCSE mathematics but is available to other students with an appropriate background. This differs from MATH10600, Mathematics 1EM by teaching statistics instead of vectors and matrices. There are regular tutorials, computational practicals and assignments.

Aims: To revise elementary mathematics in GCSE (bearing in mind the needs of students who have not studied mathematics for 2 years or more). To introduce basic algebra, trigonometry, calculus and statistics as useful tools for science students.

Relation to Other Units There is another unit for students without A level mathematics: Mathematics 1EM. It is identical to this unit for the first 17 weeks. From week 18 onwards, Mathematics 1EM has more mathematics while Mathematics 1ES has statistics (and a few lectures on mathematics).

The statistics element of this unit is available as a stand-alone 10cp unit, Elementary Statistics.

Intended learning outcomes

At the end of the unit students should be able to:

  • perform basic algebraic manipulations
  • sum simple arithmetic and geometric series
  • solve linear, simultaneous linear, quadratic, and some cubic equations
  • use numerical methods to find areas under curves, etc.
  • use trigonometry and vectors
  • differentiate and integrate simple functions and know the physical meaning of *the derivative and integral.
  • have an insight into the value, use and interest of statistical methods in *scientific work and thought
  • apply simple statistical methods in their own scientific work, and to *understand what they are doing
  • understand the statistical jargon used in scientific papers.

Transferable Skills:

Increased skills in handling mathematics and data of all kinds (numeracy skills).

Use of EXCEL for simple statistical work

Teaching details

3 lectures per week, with weekly tutorials in weeks 1 - 18. Marked work is returned to the students and difficulties explained in the tutorials. To assist students in evaluating their progress, short tests are held in weeks 5 and 9. In the last six weeks, on statistics, there are practical assignments and computing lab classes.

Assessment Details

The assessment mark will be made up as follows:

  • 10% from the midsessional examination in January.
  • 65% from written examinations in May/June (details below).
  • 25% from four practical Statistics assignments.

In addition weekly work will be marked and the results will be passed on to the honours departments to review your progress. To assist students in evaluating their progress, short tests are held in weeks 5 and 9.

Assessment of Statistics Each week's assignment is to be handed in at the end of the lecture on the date specified when the assignment is set.

The statistics assessment as follows:

  • Assignment 1 gives 20% of the Statistics mark.
  • Assignment 2 gives 25% of the Statistics mark.
  • Assignment 3 gives 25% of the Statistics mark.
  • Assignment 4 gives 30% of the Statistics mark.
  • Assignments handed in late will receive reduced or no marks.

There may be good reasons, such as illness, for handing in work late or not attending the required practical classes: you must provide evidence, such as a doctor's note, in order for marks to be awarded in such cases.

Details of the Summer Examination Candidates in Maths 1ES examinations may use calculators of approved type (no graphics or symbolic algebra, non-programmable).

The final examination in May/June consists of 2 papers on algebra and calculus. There is no examination in statistics, which is assessed by coursework.

  • Paper 1 lasts three hours. Section A has 10 short questions, all of which should be answered; it carries 40% of the marks for this paper. Section B has 6 longer questions,of which you should do FOUR. If you do more than four, your best four answers will be used for assessment. Section B carries 60% of the marks for this paper. Paper 1 examines material from E1.
  • Paper 2 lasts 1½-hours. Section A has 5 short questions, all of which should be answered; it carries 40% of the marks for this paper. Section B has three longer questions of which you should do TWO. If you do more than two, your best two answers will be used for assessment. Section B carries 60% of the marks for this paper. Paper 2 examines material from E2.

Paper 1 contributes 40% to your overall mark for the unit; paper 2 contributes 25% to your overall mark for the unit.

January examinations These Mid-sessional Examinations are right at the start of the second term. Your mark in the January examination for the unit will contribute 10% to the final assessment mark for the unit in June. It should also give you, and us, an indication of how well you are coping with the unit.

The January examination paper lasts one-and-a-half hours. Section A has 5 short questions, all of which should be answered; it carries 40% of the marks for this paper. Section B has 3 longer questions,of which you should do TWO. If you do more than two, your best two answers will be used for assessment. Section B carries 60% of the marks for this paper. Candidates may use calculators of approved type (no graphics or symbolic algebra, non-programmable).

September Examinations If you fail Mathematics 1ES in June, you may (depending on which Faculty you are in and how you have done in your other units) be allowed to resit it in September. The September examination papers have the same structure as in June, and there will also be a practical assessment in Statistics.

Reading and References

Recommended (but not required textbook):

  • Understanding Pure Mathematics, A.J. Sadler and D.W.S. Thorning (Oxford University Press 1995)

You may also find the following books helpful:

  • Help yourself to algebra, Hugh Neill (Longman 1996)
  • Mind the Gap, bridging the gap between GCSE and AS Maths, Roger Cahalin, Alessandra Desbottes & Suzanne Doyle (Coordination Group Publications 2002

Recommended (but not required) for statistics:

  • Gerald Keller, Applied Statistics with Microsoft Excel, published by Duxbury.

You might also find this useful: Bruce E. Trumbo, Learning Statistics with Real Data, Duxbury

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