Skip to main content

Unit information: Children in Society I: An introduction in 2013/14

Please note: you are viewing unit and programme information for a past academic year. Please see the current academic year for up to date information.

Unit name Children in Society I: An introduction
Unit code SOWK10001
Credit points 20
Level of study C/4
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 1 (weeks 1 - 12)
Unit director Dr. Jo Staines
Open unit status Open
Pre-requisites

None

Co-requisites

None

School/department School for Policy Studies
Faculty Faculty of Social Sciences and Law

Description

Drawing on multiple disciplines, including history, sociology, psychology and social policy, this unit examines how the concept of childhood has evolved over the past 400 years. Using an ecological framework, the experiences of children, their parents and their communities are explored, analysing the impact of religion, science, philosophy, politics, employment, educational pedagogy, and philanthropy on children’s lives.

Aims:

The unit aims to consider:

  • The concept of childhood and the interaction of many factors in its construction.
  • The use of historical sources, such as art, literature and oral histories, to study childhood.
  • The development of philosophies of children’s rights, education, family life and the role of the State since the 18th century
  • The implementation of these ideas in legislation and societal norms.
  • The influence of theorists, philosophers,writers and innovators, such as: Aries, Locke, Rousseau, Carpenter, Froebel, Montessori and the McMillan sisters.

After successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to demonstrate:

  • An understanding of the development of the concept of childhood over the last 400 years
  • Knowledge and understanding of the variety of perspectives on childhood, children’s rights and the role of family and state in that historical period
  • Knowledge and understanding of a range of educational theorists
  • An understanding of the appropriate use of historical and other sources to investigate childhood.

Intended learning outcomes

After successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to demonstrate:

  • An understanding of the development of the concept of childhood over the last 300 years
  • Knowledge and understanding of the variety of perspectives on childhood, children’s rights and the role of family and state in that historical period
  • Knowledge and understanding of a range of educational theorists
  • An understanding of the appropriate use of historical and other sources to investigate childhood.

Teaching details

Lectures and classes. Study of primary sources. Group work and presentations of assigned topics including own primary research.

Assessment Details

Formative assessment is by:

(a) a seminar presentation of a small group project which has been jointly researched, and

(b) an essay of not more than 2,000 words

Summative assessment is by 3,000 word essay

Reading and References

  • Boushell, M. Fawcett, M. and Selwyn, J. (2000), Focus on Early Childhood: Principles and Realities, Blackwell Science.
  • Cunningham, H. (2005) Children and Childhood in Western Society Since 1500, (2ND ED) Essex:Pearson.
  • Fraser, D (3rd edition, 2003) The evolution of the British welfare state. Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan
  • Hendrick, H. (1997), Children, Childhood and English society 1880-1990, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
  • Hendrick, H. (2003), Child Welfare Historical Dimensions, contemporary debates. Bristol, Policy Press.
  • Kehily M J (ed) (2009) An Introduction to Childhood Studies (2nd ed), Maidenhead: Open University Press

Feedback