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Unit information: Digital Business & E-Commerce Management in 2018/19

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Unit name Digital Business & E-Commerce Management
Unit code EFIMM0050
Credit points 15
Level of study M/7
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 2 (weeks 13 - 24)
Unit director Dr. Steve Pearce
Open unit status Not open
Pre-requisites

None

Co-requisites

None

School/department School of Economics, Finance and Management
Faculty Faculty of Social Sciences and Law

Description

Why does Digital business & E-commerce matter for businesses? What systems have changed and will change the way we buy and sell goods and services electronically? How do innovative organisations use digital applications to gain competitive advantage? What business models are used in digital businesses, what are the components? This unit introduces students to the digital environment. It is designed to give students an overview and understanding of: Digital business models, revenue models, processes for implementing digital applications, risks and ethics. The unit explores innovative digital systems, online services, online content and media, mobile and social commerce, and emerging digital applications in developing countries.

This unit analyses the issues related to the management of digital businesses. It reviews existing digital business models and applications; compares digital-commerce to other, more traditional forms of commerce, describes its major opportunities, limitations, issues and risks. It also provides a more detailed knowledge of some of the more successful business and revenue models in digital based businesses. Finally, special attention will be paid to the application of these models to emerging markets and how these models enable innovation.

Intended learning outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

  1. Apply the main concepts and theories of digital business and e-commerce
  2. Explore value propositions and propose business and revenue models for digital businesses
  3. Analyse service and business process interactions for e-commerce
  4. Understand the application of mobile and social commerce
  5. Evaluate existing digital business strategies, technologies and models
  6. Develop proposals and implementation plans for e-commerce applications in emerging economies, markets and developing countries.
  7. Develop, analyse and present an innovative digital business model

Teaching details

Lectures - 20 Hours

Seminars, casework, practical work, peer reviews and presentations - 10 hours

Independent individual and group work study – estimated 25 – 40 Hours

Assessment Details

The group project will involve analysis of business models, a poster, peer review and a group presentation. Students will work in randomly selected groups of 5-6 students within their tutorial groups to analyse a Digital Business and develop new innovative business models.

Group project (40%) and written assignment (60%) of 2,000 words which assess the learning outcomes mapped as follows;

Group Project: 2, 3, 5, 6, 7

Written Assignment: 1, 3, 4, 5, 7

For the group project, the group is allocated a mark and the individual mark would usually be the same provided individual students have contributed equally to the group work.

Reading and References

Chaffey, Dave. Digital Business & E-Commerce Management: Strategy Implementation & Practice. Pearson Education, 2015.

Brynjolfsson, Erik, and Andrew McAfee. The second machine age: Work, progress, and prosperity in a time of brilliant technologies. WW Norton & Company, 2014.

King, D., Lee, J., Liang, T. P., &Turban, D. C. (2012). Electronic commerce 2012: a managerial and social networks perspective. Pearson, Harlow.

Laudon, K. and Laudon, J. (2012), Managing Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm, Pearson, Harlow.

Brynjolfsson, E. and Saunders, A. (2010). Wired for Innovation: how Information Technology is reshaping the Economy. The MIT Press, London.

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