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Unit information: Health Sciences: Oral Biology Year 2 in 2018/19

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Unit name Health Sciences: Oral Biology Year 2
Unit code ORDS10010
Credit points 20
Level of study I/5
Teaching block(s) Academic Year (weeks 1 - 52)
Unit director Dr. Nobbs
Open unit status Not open
Pre-requisites

None

Co-requisites

None

School/department Bristol Dental School
Faculty Faculty of Health Sciences

Description

The Teaching Unit comprises Eight themes delivered in year 2 of the BDS programme. They are as follows:

Year 2: Themes 1 - 8

Oral Biology themes:

  1. Oral Mucosa
  2. Oral secretions
  3. Mineralized tissues
  4. Oral Microflora
  5. Caries
  6. Periodontium and periodontal disease
  7. Dental and facial pain
  8. Tooth morphology

The Units of Oral Biology deliver specialised teaching of anatomy, biochemistry, microbiology and physiology relating to the oral environment. Teaching is divided into eleven themes. These are delivered by both clinically and scientifically qualified staff with emphasis on relating scientific knowledge to the clinical condition at times appropriate for clinical activities within years 2 and 3 of the programme. An understanding of the situation both in health and the more common oral diseases is gained.

Intended learning outcomes

Students should obtain a knowledge and understanding of the following:

  • The tissues and organs of the body at the molecular, cellular, physiological and anatomical levels such that the student can appreciate the integration of function in the body, be aware of how pathological processes and injury may compromise such function and have sufficient knowledge of the broader aspects of the biology of the body where they impact upon and influence the delivery of dental and oral healthcare.
  • The biology of the oral and dental tissues, and the secretions associated with these tissues, at the molecular, cellular, physiological and anatomical levels such that the student has a good appreciation of normal physiological function in the oral cavity, can recognize when this is compromised and is able to use their knowledge and understanding both to diagnose abnormal function and to underpin their subsequent treatment planning.
  • The scientific basis of dentistry.

The student should acquire the skills and attributes necessary for:

  • Applying and extending the knowledge and principles taught in Year 1 medical bioscience subjects and to provide an introduction to oral biology with emphasis on its relevance to clinical dentistry.
  • Extended integration of basic and applied science as related to oral health, disease and therapeutics.
  • Integrated learning opportunities on the structure, functions and distributions of the oral tissues in the normal state.

As a consequence of this learning, the student will have:

  • Overview of dental & oral tissues and their inter-relationships (Themes 1, 3, 6, 8)
  • Structure & function of oral mucosa (Theme 2)
  • Oral sensation - taste and pain (Theme 7)
  • Composition, structure/function relationships of dental and periodontal tissues
  • Fluoride substitution of dental tissues and appreciation of both tooth crown and root canal morphologies (Themes 3, 6, 8)
  • Embryological development of the craniofacial area (Themes 1, 6).
  • Development of teeth and their supporting tissues, dentinogenesis, amelogenesis, cementogenesis and periodontal development (Themes 3, 6, 8)
  • Tissue turnover and regeneration in the oral cavity (Themes 1, 3, 6)
  • Salivary gland structure and composition and physiology of salivary secretion; role of saliva and the components of saliva. (Themes 1, 2)
  • Plaque metabolism and its effects. pH changes in the oral environment. (Themes 4, 5, 6)
  • Functional inter-relationships of oral & dental tissues and secretions and importance in defence and homeostasis of the oral cavity (Themes 1, 2, 3, 6)
  • Effect of fluoride on host tissues and bacterial metabolism. (Themes 3, 5)
  • Dental caries - molecular aspects of caries formation and inhibition. Alternative sweeteners. Erosion. (Themes 4, 5)
  • Periodontal disease – molecular aspects (Themes 1, 4, 5, 6).
  • Development of teeth and their supporting tissues, dentinogenesis, amelogenesis, cementogenesis and periodontal development (Themes 3, 6, 8)
  • Tissue turnover and regeneration in the oral cavity (Themes 1, 3, 6)

Teaching details

Lectures

Practicals/Lab Classes

Tutorials

Problem solving class

Assessment Details

Summative Assessments:

Paper 1 e-Assessment – 1 ½ hours in total (This exam contributes to 40% of the Unit mark).

Paper 2 e-Assessment – 1 ½ hours in total (This exam contributes to 40% of the Unit mark).

Paper 3 Tooth morphology spot test (This exam contributes to 20% of the Unit mark).

Reading and References

Anatomy/histology

  • Berkovitz BKB, Holland GR, Moxham BJ. Oral anatomy, histology and embryology. 4th Ed. Elsevier Mosby; 2009. ISBN 0723434115.
  • Nanci A. Ten Cate’s Oral histology: development, structure and function. 5th ed. Elsevier Mosby. 8th ed; 2012. ISBN 9780323078467.

Pathology

  • Cawson RA, Odell EW. Cawson’s essentials of oral pathology and oral medicine. 8th ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2008. ISBN 9780443101250.
  • Kidd EAM. Essentials of dental caries, 3rd ed. Oxford University Press; 2005. ISBN 0198529783.

Physiology

  • Miles TS, Nauntofte B, Svensson P. Clinical oral physiology, Quintessence Publishing Co. Ltd; 2004. ISBN 1850970910.

Microbiology

  • Marsh PD, Martin MV. Oral microbiology. 5th ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2009. ISBN 9780443101441.

Oral Biology

  • Berkovitz BKB, Moxham BJ, Linden RWA, Sloan AJ. Master dentistry volume 3. Oral biology: oral anatomy, histology, physiology and biochemistry. Churchill Livingstone; 2010. ISBN 9780702031229.

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