Skip to main content

Unit information: Contemporary Multi-Ethnic Writing of America in 2019/20

Please note: Due to alternative arrangements for teaching and assessment in place from 18 March 2020 to mitigate against the restrictions in place due to COVID-19, information shown for 2019/20 may not always be accurate.

Please note: you are viewing unit and programme information for a past academic year. Please see the current academic year for up to date information.

Unit name Contemporary Multi-Ethnic Writing of America
Unit code ENGL20110
Credit points 20
Level of study I/5
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 2 (weeks 13 - 24)
Unit director Dr. Theo Savvas
Open unit status Not open
Pre-requisites

None

Co-requisites

None

School/department Department of English
Faculty Faculty of Arts

Description

This unit aims to allow students to develop an appreciation for the diversity of American literature in the later twentieth century. Edward Said observed in Culture and Imperialism that the U.S. at the end of the twentieth century was ‘contrapuntal and often nomadic,’ a ‘porous network rather than a discrete entity’. This unit allows students to explore such diversity through Native American, African American, Asian American, Jewish American and Chicano/a literature from 1970 to the present: and to consider the relationship of these literatures to the dominant mythologies of the United States; the rise of transnationalism in American studies; and the way in which the wedding together of different cultures is reflected in narrative styles. We will consider these texts in a historical and literary-historical framework and students will be encouraged to develop a more expansive understanding of the term “American literature”.

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this unit students will have

(1) developed a sound knowledge and critical understanding of the diversity of late twentieth century American literatures;

(2) reflected critically upon the relationship of these literatures to the dominant mythologies of the United States;

(3) developed a more expansive understanding of the term “American literature”;

(4) written critically and analytically upon this literature.

Teaching details

1 x 2-hour seminar per week.

Assessment Details

  • 1 essay of 2000 words (40%)
  • 1 essay of 3000 words (60%)

Both summative essays will assess ILOs 1-4.

Reading and References

Cao, Lan, Monkey Bridge (1997).

Cisneros, Sandra, House on Mango Street (1984).

Morrison, Toni, Beloved (1987).

Mukherjee, Bharati, Jasmine (1989).

Singer, I.B., Enemies (Orig. English edition in 1972).

Welch, James, Winter in the Bone (1974).

Feedback