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Unit information: Clinical Pathology 1 (Haematology and Cytology) in 2019/20

Please note: Due to alternative arrangements for teaching and assessment in place from 18 March 2020 to mitigate against the restrictions in place due to COVID-19, information shown for 2019/20 may not always be accurate.

Please note: you are viewing unit and programme information for a past academic year. Please see the current academic year for up to date information.

Unit name Clinical Pathology 1 (Haematology and Cytology)
Unit code VETSM0055
Credit points 70
Level of study M/7
Teaching block(s) Academic Year (weeks 1 - 52)
Unit director Ms. Tennant
Open unit status Not open
Pre-requisites

None

Co-requisites

Clinical Pathology Unit 2

School/department Bristol Veterinary School
Faculty Faculty of Health Sciences

Description

This unit will develop students’ diagnostic skills in haematology and cytology of companion and large animals through exposure to clinical cases in a veterinary clinical pathology laboratory.

This unit will develop students’ diagnostic skills in cytology and haematology of companion, exotic and large animals through exposure to clinical cases in a veterinary clinical pathology laboratory.

In order to maximise case exposure the student is allocated to cytology and haematology together to take advantage of the clinical cases coming through the laboratory and ensure a wide range of experience. The student will spend blocks of time on study within this unit intermingled with specialities from Unit 1 to spread the workload over the course of the year and maximise learning experiences from both units.

Hence this unit will run for 12 months to allow each student to complete all specialisms within this unit.

The aim of this programme is that students will consolidate and build upon existing clinical knowledge and skills from their UG programme, and prior professional practice (for example the RCVS Professional Development Phase) in the areas of haematology and cytology and allied fields. The consolidation is necessary for them to maintain their knowledge and skillset. In order to ensure that both consolidation and the learning of new skills occurs students will need a high level of exposure to clinical cases. This will be achieved through full time immersion in clinical rotations. When all compulsory Units for this PG Diploma are taken into consideration this will result in a higher than standard number of hours of student input and this is reflected in total credit points for this PGDiploma being more than the standard 120. This will allow students to be properly equipped with the required knowledge for entry into the University of Bristol’s MSc in Veterinary Practice or similar programmes (ie analogous to senior residents) at other vet schools. Students will apply their knowledge and skills to the effective treatment and care of a range of clinical cases under the direction of veterinary specialists.

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Attendance at a School based clinical seminar series will form a mandatory part of this unit and will provide additional supporting clinical and scientific knowledge.

Students will be introduced to the concepts of evidence-based veterinary medicine and its application to their clinical practice by producing an Evidence-based review based on a clinical question identified during the rotations included in the Unit. Students will be supported by academic staff for this.

Intended learning outcomes

Veterinary undergraduates are taught to achieve ‘Day one competency’, the minimum standard required for registration with the RCVS, and the starting point for a practising veterinary professional.

The aim of the PG Dip in Veterinary Clinical Practice (Clinical Pathology) is to develop greater knowledge and understanding of clinical pathology and clinico-laboratory diagnostics.

Overarching learning outcomes for both units include:

Consolidation of the day one level of competency in practical skills, knowledge and understanding of common cytology and haematology findings in companion and farm animals.

Increased levels of knowledge and understanding to include less common conditions and those seen at a laboratory serving referral hospitals or in exotic species

Understanding of more advanced diagnostic techniques and procedures employed in this and other veterinary laboratories

An understanding of the principles and practice of quality assurance and quality control as they apply to these disciplines

Specific learning outcomes for each speciality within the Unit:

Haematology

  • Be able make, examine and assess blood smears in common companion and farm animal species
  • Be able to run and interpret automated blood counts/ full haemograms for companion and farm animals
  • Be able to interpret coagulation test results
  • To be confident in basic manual techniques such as PCV, D- dimer and fibrinogen measurement
  • Be able to assess quality assurance/ quality control data for these methods
  • Be able to communicate pertinent findings to client vets with further testing recommendations

Cytology

  • Be able to advise on appropriate sampling techniques in common companion and farm animal species
  • To be able to make, stain and assess cytology samples from fine needle aspirates, body cavity fluids, impression smears, diagnostic flushes/ washes
  • Be able to screen cytology samples for inflammatory or neoplastic populations and infectious organisms
  • Be able to communicate pertinent findings to client vets with further testing recommendations

Teaching details

Seminar series 1 hour per week

Clinical pathology/ anatomic pathology clinical rounds 1 hour per week

Journal club 1 hour per month

Students will be on clinics full-time during the week while on rotation. We expect much of this time will be consolidation of prior undergraduate learning / day one level of competency. Direct contact which contributes to learning new techniques and greater knowledge and understanding while on clinical rotations will be approximately 19 hours a week.

Contact Hours Per Week

22 hours/week average direct contact

Student Input

Breakdown of notional total student input (To include number of contact hours, independent learning, assessment, other activities) This unit will take place over 25 weeks during the year.

Contact hours,I ncluding MCQ exams 550 hours

Independent study 100 hours

Evidence based review 50 hours

When combined with the second Unit on this PG Diploma it results in a total credit point of 140. This is higher than the standard expectation of 120 and this is justified within the paperwork above.

Assessment Details

Assessment Outline

Clinical competency 4 x CbD During second half of rotations
Practical laboratory skills Reflective skills log Throughout rotations
MCQ 25 questions delivered June
Evidence-based review 1 June

Reading and References

Cytology

BSAVA Manual of Canine and Feline Clinical Pathology, 2nd edition. Eds Villiers and Blackwood BSAVA, Glocs

Diagnostic Cytology and Hematology of the Dog and Cat, 3rd edition, Eds Valeciano and Cowell, Mosby

Diagnostic Cytology and Hematology of the Horse, 2nd edition, Eds Cowell and Tyler, Elselvier

Manual of Diagnostic Cytology of the Dog and Cat, Ed Dunn, Wiley

Avian and Exotic Animal Hematology and Cytology,3rd edition Campbell and Ellis, Blackwell

Fundamentals of Veterinary Clinical Pathology 2nd edition, Stockham and Scott, Blackwell

Equine Clinical Pathology, Walton R.M., Wiley Blackwell

Haematology

BSAVA Manual of Canine and Feline Clinical Pathology, 2nd edition. Eds Villiers and Blackwood BSAVA Glocs

Diagnostic Cytology and Hematology of the Dog and Cat, 3rd edition, Eds Valeciano and Cowell, Mosby

Diagnostic Cytology and Hematology of the Horse, 2nd edition, Eds Cowell and Tyler, Elselvier

Avian and Exotic Animal Hematology and Cytology,3rd edition Campbell and Ellis, Blackwell

Fundamentals of Veterinary Clinical Pathology 2nd edition, Stockham and Scott, Blackwell

Veterinary Haematology; A diagnostic guide and colour atlas, 2nd edition, Harvey J.W., Elsevier

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