Handbook (taught programmes)

This is the 2019/20 Handbook and does not commit the University in respect of subsequent sessions. All taught students should read and bookmark this handbook for reference. Please check the latest version each October to ensure you have the most up to date rules. It should be read in conjunction with the University's Rules and Regulations for Students, Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes www.bristol.ac.uk/secretary/studentrulesregs/ along with other information in the University Student Handbook.

This Handbook contains important information about how we deliver education within the Faculty of Engineering and it is strongly recommended that you read it, as it may help you to avoid difficulties later on. 

Some things you need to do

As a student at the University of Bristol, you have a lot of freedom and opportunities.  The Faculty is committed to supporting your studies, but it is your responsibility to call upon this support and to engage with the opportunities offered. 

Your key obligations:

  • Tell us if you are worried about your studies.  It is difficult for us to help you if we do not know you are having difficulties before things go badly wrong. 
  • Register with a local doctor (preferably in the Student Health Service) to avoid difficulties obtaining medical notes covering illnesses that require medical certification
  • Update any change of local or home address or telephone number IMMEDIATELY. This can be done on-line (see Updating Addresses Online). 
  • Note the examination periods and ensure that you will be available then. In particular, do not book holidays during the August/September re-sit examination period.
  • Ensure that all work you submit is 100% your own, unless you include a statement acknowledging material from elsewhere, such as laboratory partners or books.
  • Remember that it’s your responsibility to turn up on time for examinations and to meet deadlines for handing in coursework in order to avoid losing marks.
  • You may also like to refer to the Student Agreement you made with the University when you registered.

Engineering Student Forms

*  Coursework extensions  *  Exam self-certification  *  Extenuating circumstances
Select 'allow' at the initial prompt.

CONTENTS - QUICK LINKS

University Key Dates

Faculty Roles and Organisation

The Faculty and its Schools

Programmes and units

Change of Circumstances

Medical and Other Extenuating Circumstances

Plagiarism and Intellectual Property

Health & Safety Guidance

Examinations and Assessment Procedures

Additional Support Available

Complaints and Appeals

Technical Support for Undergraduate Projects

Data Protection

Appendices


University Key Dates

WELCOME WEEK 23 September 2019 - 27 September 2019
TEACHING BLOCK 1 30 September 2019 - 20 December 2019
TEACHING BLOCK 2 27 January 2020 - 7 May 2020
EXAMINATION PERIODS  
JANUARY EXAMINATION PERIOD 13 January 2020 – 24 January 2020
SUMMER EXAMINATION PERIOD 18 May 2020 – 15 June 2020
RE-SIT AND SUPPLEMENTARY EXAMINATION PERIOD 24 August 2020 – 4 September 2020

 

VACATION DATES  
CHRISTMAS VACATION 23 December 2019 – 10 January 2020
EASTER VACATION 30 March 2020 - 17 April 2020
SUMMER VACATION 15 June 2020 – 18 September 2020


University closure dates can be found at www.bristol.ac.uk/university/dates/.

 

Faculty Roles and Organisation

The Dean (Professor Ian Bond) is the highest academic authority in the Faculty; overseeing the Faculty budget, strategic planning in research and teaching development within the Faculty. The Dean chairs the Faculty Board and represents the Faculty on all high- level university committees, such as University Planning and Resources Committee (UPARC), Senate and Council.

The Undergraduate Education Director (Colin Dalton) is responsible for overseeing all undergraduate matters in the Faculty, such as monitoring student progress, liaising with the Dean on education strategy and advising undergraduates when necessary. The Undergraduate Education Director chairs the Faculty Undergraduate Studies Committee, Faculty Progression Exam Board and Faculty Final Examination Board (Undergraduate) and represents the Faculty at relevant University Committees.

The Graduate Education Director (Dr Nicholas Howden) is responsible for overseeing all graduate matters in the Faculty, such as monitoring student progress, liaising with the Dean on education strategy and advising postgraduates when necessary. The Graduate Education Director chairs the Faculty Graduate Studies Committee, Final Examination Board (Postgraduate) and represents the Faculty at relevant University Committees.

The Faculty Manager (Mary Millard) is responsible for ensuring effective operations support for the delivery of the Faculty academic vision and strategy, with particular responsibility for project initiation and management. The Faculty manager oversees Faculty-level administrative and operational processes and has responsibility for budgets and resources.

The Faculty Education Manager (Siobhan Pegler) is responsible for managing the Faculty Education Team and for overseeing the student and education processes across the Faculty. This includes registration, timetabling, progress and student record administration and the provision of advice and information on education procedures.

Contact details for all key staff can be found on the Faculty of Engineering’s contact page.

The Faculty Education Team  are based in the Faculty Office, this is the main office for Faculty-related student enquiries. The Faculty Office is in room 1.43 in Queen's Building, where official documents such as status letters and transcripts are provided upon request (Mon-Fri, 9am – 4.30pm). Please note that office times may vary during Christmas, Easter and Summer vacation, and offices will be closed on all University closure days.

The Team also produces official documents for students, including:

  • Transcripts - Current students are entitled to free interim academic transcripts. One final transcript is issued free of charge to graduates within two months of their graduation ceremony. A charge will then be due for any additional copies of final transcripts.
  • Council Tax Exception letters - Bristol-based students in full time study will automatically receive exemption from Council Tax as the University notifies Bristol City Council of every student in attendance.

If you receive a bill or a letter about council tax, please fill out the Bristol City Council’s Student exemption form linked from: www.bristol.gov.uk/council-tax/student-exemptions-and-discounts.  Any request will be cross-referenced against a list of registered full-time students provided to the Council by the University. 

However, sometimes students are not on the above list, often because they are on the supplementary year and have a part-time variable mode of attendance, or there could be another reason.  If you have received a reminder about non-payment of council tax, please request a council tax exemption certificate  - by see http://www.bristol.ac.uk/engineering/contacts/ for the appropriate email address (UG or PG queries)

Please never ignore the reminder letter as the situation will not go away.

  • Student Status Letters - If you require an official letter confirming your student status you can obtain a letter from the Faculty Office  - see http://www.bristol.ac.uk/engineering/contacts/ for the appropriate email address (UG or PG queries).
    • Please allow at least two days for completion of the letter.
    • You will be required to show your student ID card when collecting the letter. Please note that outstanding debts with the University may prevent the Faculty Office from issuing such letters.
    • Students are reminded to ask the permission of an individual before using them as a referee and should give them their written permission to provide the reference when requested to do so.

Notification of change of address

You must keep the University informed as soon as possible of any change of local or home address, as we may have to reach you urgently (for example, with examination notices).

You can access and update your details online via: www.bris.ac.uk/studentinfo/

Please note that for reasons of personal privacy, student addresses or telephone numbers will not be given out to anyone other than members of staff.

Faculty Committees

There are a number of decision-making committees within the Faculty, which mirror University committees.

The Faculty Board is the highest decision-making body within the Faculty and is responsible for overseeing all major Faculty academic decisions and priorities. It ratifies reports and recommendations of policy from individual Faculty committees and discusses policy and items referred by Senate.

The Faculty Education Committee has overarching responsibility for quality assurance for all educational matters in the Faculty. It reports directly to the Faculty Board. The Committee formally considers and ratifies all programme and unit curriculum changes.

The Faculty Examination Board (Undergraduate and Postgraduate) formally approves all final examination results for taught programmes and ensures there is consistent treatment of extenuating circumstances and plagiarism/cheating penalties for students within the Faculty.

The Faculty Student Staff Liaison Committee meets four times a year and has two student representatives from each Department on its membership to discuss academic and pastoral matters that affect students.

Student Representation and Opportunities for Feeding back your Views

The student representation system is operated in partnership between the University of Bristol and the Students’ Union (UBU).   The principles of student representation and its operation and practice can be found in the Code of Practice for Student Representation (Taught Students); www.bristol.ac.uk/academic-quality/facultyadvice/policy/  

There are a range of elected positions that represent the interests of students across the key areas of student life. These include Course Reps, Senate Reps, Part-time Officers and Full-time Officers.  Please see the further information on student representation on the Student Union website.

In addition, we are always seeking to improve our programmes, and we provide the opportunity to feedback your views through questionnaires, forums, departmental student-staff liaison committees, and the Faculty Student-Staff Liaison Committee (FSSLC).  Serving on the FSSLC, representing your department, will give you useful experience, and effect real change within the Faculty. Feedback from the committee is directly acted on at the Faculty Undergraduate/Graduate Studies Committee, with responses fed back.

We aim to provide a fast response to problems reported to us, but some issues (such as matters of curriculum design) may be inherently impossible to resolve until the following academic year - when your successors will gain the benefit.

The Faculty and its Schools

The Faculty of Engineering comprises six academic departments which are grouped into two academic Schools:

CAME: School of Civil, Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, based in Queen's Building

SCEEM: School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Engineering Mathematics, based in the Merchant Venturers' Building.

Links to School and Department websites can be found at: www.bristol.ac.uk/engineering/departments/

Links to the precinct map can be found at: www.bristol.ac.uk/maps/google/index.html

Who does what for your education

All the academic staff in the Faculty have a share in contributing to your education.  All members of staff are a member of a department, and the departments are responsible for providing the programmes. 

Unit Directors

The organisation and delivery of each unit is the responsibility of the unit director.   If you have missed a compulsory activity or assessment, or may have difficulty attending one of these, then you must contact the unit director and determine a way forward.  It is not the responsibility of any teaching staff to contact you.  

Programme Directors

Each programme has a Programme Director (see Appendix 1) who is responsible for the organisation and delivery of a programme.  He or she also deals with feedback and complaints from students on the programme, conducts the school responsibilities for disciplinary cases, and advises the Faculty on appeals. 

Personal Tutors

You will be assigned a Personal Tutor when you arrive at the University and you may seek advice from your tutor on both academic and personal matters. Normally, your Personal Tutor will be a member of the academic staff in your School.  At some point during your time at Bristol, you may be taught by your Personal Tutor.

Students registered on Joint Honours programmes will normally be assigned a Personal Tutor from the lead School, though there will also be a named person to contact for any queries about your studies in the other School.

You will find details of personal tutoring at section 27 of the Code of Practice for Taught Programmes. Please also refer to ‘University Guidelines for Personal Tutoring’ at: www.bris.ac.uk/esu/studentlearning/pt/

It is important that you keep your Personal Tutor informed if, for any reason, you fall behind in your work or you are experiencing medical, personal or other problems. The sooner he or she is informed, the easier it is for the Personal Tutor to ensure that this information is taken into account.

If you keep your Personal Tutor informed of your circumstances, problems can be dealt with more easily, so please keep in regular contact with him or her. Similarly, if you are contacted by your Personal Tutor at any time, you should respond promptly as delays may affect your progress.

Please note that if there are any issues (medical or otherwise) affecting your study that you want taken into account formally by an Exam or Progression Board, you should ensure that you complete an Extenuating Circumstances form via the Engineering Student Forms app.  This is your responsibility, not that of your Personal Tutor.

Senior Tutors

As well as your individual Personal Tutor, your School will have one or more Senior Tutors (see Appendix 1). Senior Tutors are academics who support Personal Tutors. They are knowledgeable about alternative sources of support.  If you have issues that may significantly affect your studies, we may ask you to see a Senior Tutor.

 

Programmes and Units

You will receive school and/or programme handbooks at your School induction, which contain more specific information on your programme. Schools and/or programmes may also provide information on their local website or via the online learning environment called Blackboard (www.ole.bris.ac.uk).

Each programme has a Programme Director who has overall responsibility for the design and delivery of the programme. If you are in any doubt about the requirements for your degree programme, you can consult the Programme Director (see Appendix 1) in your School or the Programme Catalogue (www.bris.ac.uk/esu/unitprogcat/Welcome.jsa).

All programmes are governed by the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes. You can find these, and all aspects of the regulations and code of practice for taught programmes at: www.bristol.ac.uk/academic-quality/assessment/codeonline.html.

Credit points are awarded for successful completion of the units that make up your degree programme. You will be informed about the precise unit requirements of each unit you study when you register. Note that some units may require a certain level of attendance as well as the completion of assessments or other tasks compulsory for the award of credit points. If you have any doubt about the criteria for the award of credit in any unit, or the mode by which your competence is assessed, you should consult the Unit Director. By accepting a place on any programme, you undertake to fulfil the associated programme and unit requirements.

Undergraduate students should be aware that the normal credit points total required in each year is 120 or 130.   You will not be permitted to study more than 120 or 130 credit points in total per year.  The University will make additional charges for units taken in excess of programme requirements.

For Postgraduate students, successful completion of 180 credits is required for the award of an MSc.

Policy for Recording Educational Activities

The University has a centrally supported enterprise video platform, Re/Play, which allows the creation, editing, publishing (via Blackboard) and management of Rich Media content. At Bristol the software has been deployed to capture Lectures through a phased deployment of equipment to teaching rooms throughout the University.

Further information on the project is available on the Strategic Projects Office Re/Play webpages (www.bristol.ac.uk/tel/support/tools/mediasite/).

PLEASE NOTE: These recordings are not designed to substitute for attendance at lectures and, in many cases, only part of a lecture or only selected lectures may be available.

You can find important information in the University's Policy for Recording Educational Activities (section 12 of the University's Rules and Regulations).  Please especially note the section on Student Recording of Lectures (points 27- 33 in the Policy):

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/secretary/student-rules-regs/

Absence: notification of illness etc.

It is a University requirement that any absences during term-time must be formally recorded as soon as possible after the period of absence through self-certification. You should do this by completing a ‘Self Cert Absence’ form via the online Engineering Student Forms.

If you miss an assessment activity for good reason, it is your responsibility at the earliest opportunity to contact the member of staff running the activity and make arrangements for dealing with the absence.  It is not sufficient to submit a self-certification form or other evidence for the absence without agreeing a way forward with the member of staff involved.  You must not rely on third parties, such as your tutor, to contact the member of staff involved on your behalf.  This must be done as soon as possible otherwise you may be penalised for the late submission of coursework.

If you know in advance that you are going to miss a Personal Tutorial, or a non-assessed activity please notify the member of staff responsible by phone or e-mail or via a friend if necessary, as soon as possible.

IMPORTANT: Please also refer to the information on absences from examinations, in Section 6 of the University’s Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes; http://www.bristol.ac.uk/academic-quality/assessment/regulations-and-code-of-practice-for-taught-programmes/student-absence/.

Attendance

All students are required to maintain a good level of attendance and remain engaged with their programme of study.  In the Student Agreement (www.bristol.ac.uk/secretary/studentrulesregs/agreement.html) you agree to:

  • attend formal teaching and learning events (lectures, seminars, tutorials, lab classes, etc.), associated with your programme of study, subject to absence for medical or other agreed reasons;
  • complete and submit by the required deadlines any work to be assessed as part of your programme of study, including any assignments, laboratory or project work related to individual units (unless extenuating circumstances for which you have provided evidence are agreed by the relevant tutor(s));
  • not hinder the studies of others and pursue your studies diligently, contributing effectively to the programme on which you are registered.

Please note that attendance is compulsory in laboratory classes.  An attendance record is kept, and absence without a good reason (which must be backed up by a self-certification form or medical certificate) will incur a penalty associated with any assessment linked to the laboratory, such as the deduction of marks.  Some laboratories or other activities may be "must pass" meaning that you must attend them in order to gain the credit for the unit. If you are absent from a laboratory class, it is your responsibility to contact the Unit Director and agree arrangements to cover your absence.

Those students that fail to maintain good attendance and achieve the academic attainment required will be referred by the School to the Faculty.  Based on the information received, the Faculty may decide to issue a warning to the student and/or to make changes to their student status (e.g. deem them withdrawn or suspended). 

In addition, international students in receipt of a Tier 4 student visa are required to remain engaged with their programme of study.  We will take account of expected contact points between you and your programme of study and report on these once a month through an online monitoring system.  Expected contacts will include, but are not limited to the following:

  • attendance at lectures, tutorials or seminars
  • attendance at tests, examinations or assessment boards
  • attendance at laboratory sessions
  • submission of assessed or non-assessed coursework
  • submission of dissertation/coursework/reports
  • attendance at any meeting with a supervisor or Personal Tutor
  • attendance at an appointment with a welfare advisor or an international student advisor
  • attendance on field trips

You will find all the Rules and Regulations for students at: www.bristol.ac.uk/secretary/studentrulesregs/

Faculty Workload Statement

Student workloads in the Engineering Faculty are calculated on the assumption that you will work an average of 40 hours per week over the academic year.  10 credits therefore represent about 100 hours of student work.  This workload includes all activities related to the delivery and assessment of taught units.

A major component of this load is the time that you spend in class, in contact with the teaching staff, which includes lectures, laboratories, computing classes, tutorials, examples classes and design classes.  For undergraduate students in the early years of the Engineering programmes, this scheduled time typically amounts to 17 -25 hours per week; in the later years this reduces to 7-12 hours on average as more time is allocated to unscheduled work on individual or group projects.

Outside timetabled activities, you are expected to pursue your own independent learning in order to build your knowledge and understanding of the subjects you are studying.  Such independent activities include reviewing lecture material, reading textbooks, working on examples sheets, completing coursework, writing up laboratory notes, preparing for in-class progress tests and revising for examinations.

The 100 hours per 10 credits includes all the time that you will need to spend on completing coursework assignments to the required standard or preparing for and taking examinations.  For units that are assessed by coursework alone, the full 100 hours per 10 credits is expected to be used in completing the coursework and so these units may put a higher demand on your time during the normal teaching year.  Exams are held in January as well as May/June and coursework deadlines are spread out throughout the teaching year. You will therefore need to plan carefully to make sure that you can meet your coursework deadlines while still keeping up with your scheduled classes.  Your Department will provide you with a coursework schedule each year to allow you to manage your workload efficiently.

Assessment and Feedback on your Work

The amount and type of both assessment and feedback within the units that you study will vary, and the details given here are guidelines on what you should normally expect in units within the Faculty of Engineering.

Assessments are designed to test achievement of the unit learning outcomes and the appropriate formats to meet these are used. The norms outlined here are not a strait-jacket and will be varied when there are good educational reasons.

You should be informed of the format and weighting of all assessment methods used in a unit at the start of the unit. This information is usually made available via unit handbooks and/or Blackboard. Assessment methods across and within units may vary considerably. Knowledge and understanding of the material covered in a unit and the attainment of learning outcomes may be assessed in many ways including the use of tests or exams and coursework.

Assessment is often termed either “summative” or “formative”. The primary purpose of summative assessments is to determine the standard that you have attained in a subject. Beyond a numerical mark, there are usually limited opportunities for feedback on your performance. This is particularly true of written examinations for which it is not possible to give individual feedback; however, feedback on the exam as a whole may take place. In addition, there are formative assessments or tasks associated with your units. These are designed to help you develop the skills necessary to master a subject and for you to assess how well you are doing, and they should give you much more feedback on your work. Formative assessments may contribute a small amount to the overall unit mark or nothing at all; however, their importance is not determined by the number of marks available, and it is often essential to complete formative assessments in order to perform well in summative assessments. Formative assessments are not optional extras, but an important part of learning and students have a responsibility for their successful completion if they wish to successfully complete their programmes of study.

Most units have formal examinations or tests as part of their assessment methods. Many written examinations largely consist of long questions, often requiring a solution to an engineering problem. A variety of other forms may also be used in formal examinations such as multiple-choice questions (MCQs), short answer questions, or essays. Negative marking may be used in MCQ tests. Some units (primarily those in the early years of a programme) have mid-unit assessments which tend to be worth 10-20% of the unit mark. These exams are usually designed to give you practice at the types of assessments used in end-of-unit exams and you should expect to receive some feedback on your performance in them.

Written exams usually account for between 50-100% of the unit mark, with the balance made up by coursework; for some units the proportion of assessment by examination may be smaller, and it is not uncommon for units to be entirely assessed through coursework. The range of methods used for coursework assessment is very wide. Often a unit will also have laboratory exercises which require attendance at the laboratory in the appropriate timetabled slot and completion of some form of write-up. Where appropriate to assessment of the learning outcomes other assessment methods may also be used. For example, design units will often require the completion of design exercises and programming units the writing of code. Project units will usually require at least the completion of a report and an interview. In all of these exercises, the requirements for the assessments, their deadline, and how they should be submitted will be laid out in advance and it is the responsibility of students to meet these requirements.

Some units will require students to work as a group. Often, the ability to work in a group is one of the learning objectives of the unit and you must do so. Normally there will be some form of peer assessment to allow you to state how you think is the relative achievement for the members of your group.

In some units your coursework may be peer-marked and it important that you engage fully with this form of marking as research has shown it to be a powerful tool in improving learning.

Where appropriate, there will be a length limit for written pieces of coursework.

You should be aware that pieces of coursework may be submitted to the Turnitin and other software to check for plagiarism.

Feedback

You will receive feedback on your work in a variety of ways. Feedback is designed to help you reflect on what you have done well and what you need to do to improve. Please remember that the best feedback is usually given as part of an active dialogue, so don’t be afraid to ask for more if you need it! It is your responsibility to engage with the feedback opportunities that you are given. In some cases, you will be invited to ask for feedback if you feel you need it. It is your responsibility to choose to take up such an invitation. Feedback is also not a passive process, that all you need to do is to wait for comments to be sent to you that will magically allow you to improve your attainment: the more that you engage with problem classes, example sheets, and formative assessments, the larger the amount of feedback you will receive, the better its quality, and the more it will be targeted to your specific needs. The Faculty operates an open-door policy whereby when you feel you need extra support, you can approach teaching staff directly, so you have the opportunity to obtain as much feedback as you want or need.

You will receive feedback on your academic work and progress in at least some of the following ways:

  • The marks you are given for pieces of work - this is obviously a key indicator of how well you have done!
  • Written comments on coursework from markers.
  • Verbal comments from staff including tutors, lecturers, demonstrators, and project supervisors, often during timetabled activities such as problems classes and laboratories.
  • Audience response devices used in lectures, workshops, etc.
  • Electronically, for example via formative quizzes on Blackboard.
  • Your peers – this can come via peer-marked assignments or by simply chatting to your friends about your work. Don’t forget that your peers can give you very useful feedback on how to improve!  Many units will also have forums set up on Blackboard or elsewhere to allow you to discuss your work with other students.

The amount of time required to give you feedback on a piece of formative assessment will depend on the nature of the assessment task and other programme-specific factors, but feedback must normally be provided within three working weeks of the submission deadline, unless there is a special reason why this deadline cannot be met.

Further information on the assessments can be found in the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes: www.bris.ac.uk/secretary/studentrulesregs/examregs.html.

Late submission of coursework

The following penalties apply for late submission of coursework:

  • For work submitted up to 24 hours after the agreed submission deadline, a penalty of ten marks out of 100 from the mark the student would have received applies (e.g. coursework that is marked at 70% would then become 60% once the penalty is applied).  If the coursework is being marked out of 20 then the penalty will be 3/20.
  • For work submitted 2-6 days after the agreed submission deadline, a bare pass will be given (50% for Level M units, 40% for all other units) OR the original mark less 10%, whichever is lower.
  • Once seven days has elapsed after the submission deadline, the student will receive a mark of zero, although departments may still require work of a suitable standard to be submitted in order for credit to be awarded.

Maximum length of coursework

If a maximum length of coursework is specified, it must not be exceeded otherwise a penalty may be applied.

Library Services

The Faculty of Engineering’s library is located in the Queen's Building Library: www.bristol.ac.uk/library/locations-opening/queens-library/.

There are many information resources available to students of Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science. You can search for them on www.bristol.ac.uk/library/find and you will find a list of resources specific to your subject at www.bristol.ac.uk/library/subject-support/.

Borrowing from the library: Undergraduates and taught postgraduates may borrow 40 items from the library at any one time.  Staff and research postgraduates may borrow 75 items at any one time. Most items can be borrowed for 28 days, or for much longer if you renew. 

Women in Engineering

The Faculty of Engineering is committed to providing a positive working environment for women. By developing good employment practices, tackling the unequal representation of women in research and teaching and improving career progression for female academics, the Faculty is contributing to the national goal of advancing women in sectors traditionally dominated by men.  Each school also has a Women’s Senior Tutor.

Please see the Women in Engineering website which contains information about awards and scholarships, events, profiles, publications and many useful resources and links: www.bristol.ac.uk/engineering/equality-diversity/women/.

Industrial Liaison Office

The Faculty of Engineering has a wide range of links with world-class industry. A dedicated Industrial Liaison Office (ILO) manages and develops these relationships for the benefit of our students to ensure that you are involved with engineering (and engineering-related) industry from the start of your studies. Developing employability skills and industry contacts in a competitive job market is crucial to helping you secure employment in the industry of your choice when you graduate. Some of the initiatives we work on for Faculty students include:

  • Developing summer internships for all undergraduate students including international opportunities for overseas students
  • Arranging an industrial mentor for Faculty first years
  • Producing regular ILO e-newsletters which provide information on activities and events, internship and job opportunities
  • Organising regular ‘Inside Track’ lectures from speakers in a range of industries to share their inside knowledge with you
  • Working with the Careers Service on regular ‘Inside Track’ discussion seminars to help you enhance your employability by putting your questions directly to engineering and related employers and careers experts
  • Managing a dedicated Engineering and Industry LinkedIn Group exclusively for students, staff, alumni and industrial contacts to help you to develop a professional network
  • Developing more industrial academic projects
  • Encouraging companies to provide more internships, prizes and scholarships

Please visit our website for more information: www.bristol.ac.uk/engineering/ilo/.

Bristol Futures

Bristol Futures (http://www.bristol.ac.uk/bristol-futures/) is being designed to clearly define what makes the ‘Bristol Graduate’ unique. It will build upon our core academic values and the benefits of a research-led curriculum and encourage our students to be creative, open-minded, confident free thinkers, who make judgements and decisions based on evidence, taking account of the wider context. The University's Study Skills service is part of Bristol Futures and it has been designed to help students develop and enhance a set of skills to be better prepared for university study, helping to improve grades and even helping in students’ professional and personal life. For more information about this please see the Study Skills web page at: www.bristol.ac.uk/students/study/skills-development/study-skills/. 

Change of Circumstances

Procedure for transferring to a different Programme

If you wish to transfer to another programme within the University you should first see your Personal Tutor, who will help you determine whether this is the best course of action for you. You will need to obtain the agreement of any agency that is funding you and find out, from Student Finance if applicable, whether there will be any financial implications.

If you decide to transfer, you will need to sign a Transfer Form (available from your School Office). This must also be signed by your existing department and the new department (if applicable). 

In addition, all Tier 4 visa-holding students who are transferring programme need to get the form signed by an International Adviser to confirm that they have discussed any implications on their visa as a result of the transfer. 

Undergraduate students in their Second Year are reminded that if they are thinking of transferring from a four-year to a three-year programme, they should discuss this with the Programme Director during their Second Year and ensure that a transfer form is completed and signed prior to the start of their Third Year. Only in exceptional circumstances will such transfers be allowed once the Third Year has started. All second-year students are invited to a meeting in the early part of the autumn term where options to transfer to a programme with Study Abroad are discussed.  Eligibility for transferring to a programme with Study Abroad (where the third year is spent at an institution overseas) is based on academic performance and availability of places and is competitive. 

Please see the appendix 5 of the Policy for Student Transfer between Undergraduate Programmes and Units of the University of Bristol.

Visa holding students who are considering transferring programme must also contact the International Office (www.bristol.ac.uk/international/contact/) in person or via email at student-visa-advice@bristol.ac.uk prior to requesting a transfer to discuss the implications for their student visa. You may need to return home and get a different visa.

Procedure for Withdrawal

Students who wish to make an external transfer outside the University or to withdraw from their studies at the University should contact their School and request a Withdrawal Form.

Withdrawals should be discussed with your Personal Tutor and a Withdrawal Form (available from your School Office) completed as soon as possible. If you are a home student thinking of going on to study at a different institution, you should contact Student Finance England (if applicable) to discuss the possible financial implications.

The Faculty operates a ‘deemed withdrawn’ process, whereby if a student is not attending the University and fails to make contact, given three written notices by the School, the Faculty Education Team will send one final written notice. If no reply is given by the deadline set by the Faculty, the student’s status will be changed to ‘withdrawn’. The Faculty will then issue a letter of confirmation and update the University’s student record system (SITS) accordingly.

Procedure for Suspension of Study/Leave of Absence

From time to time and for a variety of reasons outlined below, students may request a suspension of their studies. If you suspend your studies, you leave the University for a period of time and then return, either where you left off or to repeat a period of study.

There are normally four possible grounds for a suspension:

1.  Medical

A medical certificate must be produced from a qualified doctor to support any claim for a suspension on medical grounds. Return may depend on your health and academic suitability. A condition of return will be a further medical certificate supporting your return to study. If there has been a prolonged absence from the University due to illness, it may be in your best academic interests to repeat some, or all, of your studies.

Guidance on an agreed suspension of studies where a student’s performance or behaviour is being adversely affected by a mental health difficulty, is covered by the University’s Fitness to Study Policy and Procedure (pdf).

2.  Personal / Financial / Career Opportunity

Suspension may be appropriate if you suffer serious personal problems whilst at University, such as circumstances affecting your family or financial difficulties. Alternatively, you may receive an opportunity to further your career or spend a year as an officer for the Student’s Union.

3.  Transfer to a different programme

This generally only applies to first year students who wish to suspend studies for the remainder of the year and then effectively start again on a different programme at the beginning of the following session. In such cases, you must request a suspension when you transfer and gain authorisation from the transferring and receiving Schools.

4.  Year-long absences for work or study

Such suspensions will only be granted if there is a sound reason and the study or work involved is deemed relevant to the student's studies in Bristol.

There is no automatic right for a student to suspend their studies for a period of time.  A request for a suspension of studies must be recommended by the student’s School and approved by the Faculty.  Please see the guidance in Section 7 of the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes for examples of legitimate grounds for suspension of study: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/academic-quality/assessment/regulations-and-code-of-practice-for-taught-programmes/suspension/.

Schools may request supporting evidence from medical, counselling or other relevant services before agreeing to recommend a suspension of studies.  If approved, the suspension of studies will normally end at the start of the next academic year.  

Suspension must be for a defined period. If students are unable to return on the agreed date, they must seek further approval to extend their period of suspension. A suspension of studies may only extend beyond one year in exceptional circumstances. Students for whom one year of suspension becomes insufficient should withdraw from their studies and reapply to recommence studies at a later date.

The criteria for a return from suspension of studies must be set out and agreed by relevant parties (the student, the School and a representative of the Faculty) at the point of suspension and the agreement formally recorded and sent to the student. If circumstances change during the period of suspension then it may be appropriate for the criteria to be revisited, in consultation with the relevant parties.  Where appropriate, you may be required to provide a  the medical certificate, which determines that the student is fit enough to return to study, should be issued from within the UK.

If you need to apply for a suspension of studies, please complete the Suspension of Studies Form (available from your School office).  Your School will then consider this request and, if they agree to it, they will present it to the Faculty for formal approval.  A suspension can only be backdated for up to one month from the start of the absence period to account for circumstances where the student’s absence from the University is unavoidable or urgently required.  It is therefore very important for students to complete the Form promptly if a suspension is required.

You are strongly encouraged to consult the Student Funding Office prior to any suspension of studies to ensure that you are fully aware of any financial implications arising from your suspension. Full information on fee regulations is also available in the Student Handbook or at: www.bristol.ac.uk/fees-funding/tuition-fees/.

In addition, all tier 4 visa-holding students who are suspending study need to get the form signed by an International Adviser to confirm that they have discussed any implications on their visa as a result of the suspension.   A suspension of study affects immigration status in the UK and the University is required to report changes in status to the Home Office. 

Tier 4 visa holding students who are considering suspending their studies must also contact Student Visa Services (www.bristol.ac.uk/directory/visas/) in person or via email at student-visa-advice@bristol.ac.ukprior to requesting a suspension of studies to discuss the implications for their student visa and their ability to remain in the  UK.

The University of Bristol is not responsible for students during their periods of suspension.

Medical and Other Extenuating Circumstances

It is possible that at some point you will suffer some disruption to your studies through illness or other Extenuating Circumstances, whether relational or financial. Extenuating circumstances are circumstances external to study within the university that a student believes has affected their performance in assessment. Please carefully read the important information on Extenuating Circumstances in the University’s Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes.

A certain low level of disruption is normal and is part of life. However, for a few of you, the disruption will be more serious. We try to take appropriate account of this in any decisions that affect you. However, we cannot do this unless you let us know what is going on. For this reason, it is vital that you keep your School informed about any Extenuating Circumstances disrupting your studies. They will be able to advise you on any adjustments that can be made to your programme of study to help you cope with the disruption.

You may also find it helpful to remember in this context that the University assumes a full-time student will be able to devote 40 hrs a week during term-time to their studies. For this reason, we recommend that students do not take on more than 15 hours a week paid work. The need to do paid work is not, in itself, an extenuating circumstance.

Please note that wherever reference is made to self-certification forms and extenuating circumstances forms in the above weblinks, that in Engineering these forms should always be completed using the Engineering - Student Forms App.

Please also read the information on extenuating circumstances in your School/Programme Handbook.

Extenuating Circumstance Committees

School Boards of Examiners have a committee which considers and classifies all medical and other extenuating circumstances submitted to them. An extenuating circumstances form must be completed online using the Engineering - Student Forms App as soon as possible after the problem has occurred and before the deadline set by your School. Evidence regarding personal matters such as illness or bereavement must be submitted to the relevant person in advance of the meeting in order for it to be taken into account. The committee is made up of a very small group of staff who consider cases confidentially and anonymously and a classification of circumstances is presented to the relevant Exam Board anonymously.

It is very important to submit any extenuating circumstances as they occur in your studies. Any such matters which could have been raised before the meeting of the Exam Board, but without valid reason were not raised, will not be considered in the event of an appeal. Some examples of reasons which are not valid are:

  • being too busy
  • cultural reasons
  • embarrassment
  • thinking that you would pass

Disability Services and Students with Chronic Conditions

Disability Services provides a confidential advice, information and guidance service to students with a condition or disability that affects their ability to study. For further information please visit their website: www.bristol.ac.uk/disability-services/.

Alternative Exam Arrangements (AEAs)

It is difficult to make extra time arrangements for tests taking place within lecture slots. Our experience is that the nature of these tests is such that lack of time is rarely an issue for any students when completing the tests. However, if a student with an approved extra time entitlement considers that they have been adversely affected by not having the extra time for such a test, they should raise this with the unit organiser as soon as possible after the test. 

Alternative Exam Arrangements (AEAs) are any reasonable adjustments made to an exam assessment where the standard exam arrangements will put you at a disadvantage because of a disability, health condition or specific learning difficulty, such as dyslexia. 

  • For the January examination period the deadline to request Alternative Arrangements is 10am 20 November 2019.
  • For the Summer examination period the deadline to request Alternative Arrangements is 16 March 2020.
  • For the September examination period the deadline to request Alternative Arrangement is 15 July 2020.

Alternative Exam Arrangements (AEAs) for students with a disability, health condition or specific learning difficulty, such as dyslexia.

Disability Services are the sole recommender of AEAs for students in this category, further guidance and information on how to apply can be found on their website here: www.bristol.ac.uk/disability-services/study-support/alternative-exam-arrangements/.

Do I need to complete a form?

  • If you already have an agreed Disability Support Summary (DSS) with AEA recommendations included and do not require any changes, then you do not need to re-apply for AEAs as these are already in place.
  • If you do not have a DSS but your School have previously organised AEAs and the requirements have not changed, then you do not need to re-apply for AEAs as these are already in place.
  • If you do not have a DSS and have not previously had AEAs please complete the online AEAs form via the above link.

Alternative Exam Arrangements (AEAs) for students who are pregnant, temporarily ill or injured. Further information on how to make a temporary request for AEAs can be found here: www.bristol.ac.uk/disability-services/students/injuries-illness-pregnancy/.

Plagiarism and Intellectual Property

Plagiarism

The following paragraph is an extract from section 3.2 of the Examination Regulations, which defines Plagiarism and describes some examples:

'Plagiarism' is the unacknowledged inclusion in a student's work of material derived from the published or unpublished work of another.  This constitutes plagiarism whether it is intentional or unintentional.  "Work" includes internet sources as well as printed material.

Examples include: 

  • Quoting another's work "word for word" without placing the phrase(s), sentence(s) or paragraphs(s) in quotation marks and providing a reference for the source.
  • Using statistics, tables, figures, formulae, data, diagrams, questionnaires, images, musical notation, computer code etc. created by others without acknowledging and referencing the original source.  This list is not intended to be exhaustive.
  • Summarising, or paraphrasing the work or ideas of another without acknowledging and referencing the original source.  "Paraphrasing" means re-stating another author's ideas, meaning or information in a student's own words.
  • Copying the work of another student, even where the initial collaboration is legitimate, e.g. joint project work, and then presenting the resulting work as one's own. If people are working together in the same laboratory group, one would expect their results to be identical.  If students are unclear about the extent of collaboration which is permitted in joint work they should consult the relevant tutor.
  • Submitting, in whole or in part, work which has previously been submitted at the University of Bristol or elsewhere, without fully referencing the earlier work.  This includes unacknowledged re-use of the student's own submitted work.
  • Buying or commissioning an essay or other piece of work and presenting it as a student's own.

Avoidance of plagiarism in the Faculty of Engineering:

  • If people are working together in the same laboratory group, one would expect their results to be identical. The conclusions drawn from the results, on the other hand, should be individual work, and should be written in each student's own words without collusion.
  • Computer programs should differ substantially not just in the names of variables.
  • If you want to copy the ideas or paraphrase the words of another author (in an essay, for example) there is no problem provided that you indicate clearly what the source is.
  • You should not normally hand in material containing whole sentences of another author’s work. If you do need to do this, the extracts must be shown as such by means of quotation marks, indentation, or italics, and explicitly acknowledged.
  • Small amounts of cutting and pasting text from the Web is permitted, but only if fully referenced to the appropriate website.  However, cutting and pasting large amounts of text, even if referenced, is considered to be bad academic practice.  It must not be possible for a reader to gain the impression that the work is your own.
  • It is good practice to include an ‘Acknowledgements’ section (if appropriate) in every piece of coursework you submit.

Please see further information on plagiarism; www.bristol.ac.uk/library/support/findinginfo/plagiarism/

You will find that you will be required to submit work electronically as well as in printed form. This is so we can take advantage of new computer systems which can check electronic documents for plagiarism.  The Faculty also employs software that can detect similarities in structure between submitted computer programs.  The detection of plagiarism in computer code is particularly easy and every year a number of students have disciplinary action taken against them for this.  We can also detect when a student has posted a bid request for software code on websites such as Rent-A-Coder.  So be warned.

Important note: lending work to other students to copy is also very bad practice and should be avoided at all costs.  When similarities in assignments are found and plagiarism is suspected, all students may need to attend a plagiarism hearing to be interviewed if the origination of the work is unclear.  Please also be aware that students may in special circumstances (such as illness) do their assignments later in the year. Also, modified versions of assignments may be used in later years. For these reasons you must not make your work publicly available at any time, including after graduation.  Please note that students may be subject to disciplinary measures for making their work available to other students to copy, under Section 2.2b of the University Student Disciplinary Regulations; (www.bristol.ac.uk/media-library/sites/secretary/documents/student-rules-and-regs/student-disciplinary-regulations.pdf), for which misconduct includes: Disruption of, or improper interference with, the academic, administrative, sporting, social or other activities of the University. Precedents do exist in the University of students being disciplined for this reason.

Should a candidate be suspected of plagiarism, the principal marker of the work will notify the chairman of the departmental board of examiners and will provide a brief report outlining the allegation.  If the alleged offence is considered to be minor, the student will be interviewed at Departmental level by a panel made up of two senior members of the Department.  During the interview the student’s work will be discussed, with the aim of determining whether the allegations are founded.  If the interview panel is satisfied that there was no deliberate attempt by the student to obtain an unfair advantage in the assessed work, the case will be recorded on the student's departmental file for future reference and a penalty may be applied.   Penalties might include having the original mark disregarded with the opportunity to submit a new piece of work, or a lower or a zero-mark recorded with no opportunity to submit another piece of work.  You should note that having your coursework mark reduced could result in you failing the unit which in turn may result in you failing the year.

If the alleged offence is considered to be more serious, the interview will be conducted at Faculty level and the panel will comprise three senior members of the Faculty/Department. If the interview panel feels there is evidence of deliberate dishonesty, the matter will be dealt with at University level under the Student Disciplinary Regulations.  Where cheating has been detected but an account of what has taken place cannot be agreed with the students involved, then the case will be referred to the Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University to resolve.

Cases of cheating or serious plagiarism will normally be mentioned in student references. Penalties for serious offences will be more severe and can even include the exclusion of the student from the award of a degree. Please note that the Faculty deems second offences to be serious, and plagiarism cases involving projects are usually deemed to be serious.

Penalties applied to recent cases of plagiarism (all first offences) in the Faculty of Engineering include:

  • Student X copied text into his Case Study directly from some websites without referencing them.  The mark recorded for the exercise was zero.
  • Student Y included a web reference in the list of references for a project report, but the reference was not cited in the text.  The project mark given reflected this shortcoming.
  • Student X and Y admitted to unauthorised group working and copying and had their marks for a piece of coursework reduced to zero.
  • Penalties applied to recent serious cases of plagiarism in the Faculty of Engineering include:
  • Student X advertised for code on Rent-A-Coder on a number of assignments and was excluded from the award of an MSc degree.
  • Student Y used computer code created by others without acknowledging and referencing the original source in the fourth year research project.  This resulted in failure of the project and hence the failure of the MEng.  A BEng degree was awarded instead.

As you can see, the consequences can be very serious, so please do not plagiarise.  If you are experiencing difficulties, please discuss these with your tutor to see if any solutions can be found. 

Please also see Section 2.9 of the Exam Regulations on cheating.

Full details of the procedures for handling cases of cheating and plagiarism, and the penalties that may be applied can be found in Section 4 of the Examination Regulations.

The factors that will be taken into account when deciding whether an offence is minor or more serious can be found in section 8 of the Examination Regulations.

A student may appeal against a finding of guilt or against the imposition of a penalty.

Intellectual Property

Intellectual Property is the term used to describe the outputs of creative endeavour in literary, artistic, industrial, scientific and engineering fields that can be protected under legislation. Please see further information in the Intellectual Property Policy for Students (section 11 of the Rules and Regulations for Students).

 

Health and Safety Guidance

Health and Safety Policy

The University is covered by the requirements of the Health and Safety at Work Act of 1974. This imposes a duty on the University to ensure that staff and students have access to a safe working environment throughout their University career. It also imposes on individuals the duty to act responsibly (specific responsibilities are shown below).

To this end, the Faculty has instituted a Health & Safety Policy and has adopted guidelines for the assurance of a safe working environment in offices, laboratories and workshop areas. This documentation is available on request, from the Faculty Office or the Laboratory Managers or on the following website: www.bristol.ac.uk/engineering/health-safety/index.html

The Student's Health and Safety Responsibilities

Within the context of their knowledge and status, students have a duty to:

  • Take care of their own health and safety and that of others who may be affected by their actions.
  • Co-operate with the University in complying with the University's legal duties, for example by complying with instructions and training.
  • Never intentionally interfere with or misuse anything that has been provided in the interests of health, safety or welfare.
  • Work in accordance with the instruction and training provided to them, particularly in relation to the use of any machinery, work equipment, transport equipment, dangerous substances, means of production or safety device.
  • Inform their academic supervisor, or another member of staff without delay, of any work situation, work equipment etc, which might present a serious and imminent danger, or of any shortcoming in the protection arrangements in place for Health and Safety.
  • Students should report all accidents, work related ill health conditions and "near miss" incidents to their academic supervisor, and where appropriate the School Safety Advisor or Technical Manager.
  • Students should behave in laboratory/workshop areas in an appropriate manner and avoid horseplay or any other actions that could place them or their colleagues at risk of injury.  Failure to observe this requirement, or those of any safety notices or instructions with which they have been made familiar, is a disciplinary offence and will be dealt with as such.

On arrival at the University students are required to make known to their supervisor/tutor any circumstances or conditions that may affect their health and safety (such as disabilities, allergies or similar conditions). This will enable the student and the University to discuss and agree appropriate health and safety procedures.

Staff Responsible for Health and Safety

  • Overall and final responsibility for Health & Safety is that of the Dean of the Faculty, Professor Ian Bond
  • Day to day responsibility for ensuring this policy is put into practice, is delegated to the Faculty Manager,
  • Mary Millard and Faculty Safety Manager & Advisor Julie Etches (engf-safety@bristol.ac.uk).
  • All Academic Staff who act as Personal Tutors for Undergraduate or Postgraduate Students also have explicit responsibility for their Health & Safety.
  • To ensure Health & Safety standards are maintained/ improved, the following Technical Managers act in an advisory capacity in the Faculty Laboratories:
Name Area covered Phone Email
Greg Kemble Technical Services Manager 0117 33 15377 Greg.kemble@bristol.ac.uk
Jude Britton Technical Services Manager 0117 42 82730 Jude.britton@bristol.ac.uk
Darren Roderick Laboratories & Facilities (QB) 0117 42 82729 Darren.roderick@bristol.ac.uk
Matt Finch Faculty Workshops & Fabrication 0117 33 15824 Matt.finch@bristol.ac.uk
  • Within the offices and Faculty communal spaces the following people, School Safety Advisors (SSA) are available for advice and further information:
Name Area covered Phone Email
Zoe Fogarty CAME School Office Manager 0117 33 15614 zoe.fogarty@bristol.ac.uk
Chiara Singh-Fisher SCEEM School Office Manager 0117 33 15109 Chiara.singh-fisher@bristol.ac.uk
Rahim Ahmed Faculty Office Manager 0117 33 15005 Rahim.ahmed@bristol.ac.uk

In addition to the above, the Faculty has assigned Academic Lab Leaders, Area Safety Advisors and Technical Staff who have advisory Health & Safety responsibility for individual laboratories, details are available on the Faculty H&S website pages at: www.bristol.ac.uk/engineering/health-safety/index.html

Emergency Evacuations

Alarms sound continuously when the building has to be evacuated for any reason. When the alarm sounds:

  • Leave the building promptly by the most convenient route. If your normal exit out of the building is blocked by smoke or fire you should follow the green fire exit signs.
  • DO NOT USE THE LIFTS.
  • Maintain silence, do not rush or panic or attempt to pass others and follow the instructions given to you by the Fire Wardens and Security staff.
  • If in the Queen's Building, the assemble point is on the far side of University Walk, up the hill near Medical Science.
  • If in the Merchant Venturers Building, the assemble point is in the Lower Courtyard between MVB and Wills Building.
  • Do not re-enter the building when the alarm stops sounding, but wait until specifically told that it is safe to do so.

If you find a fire or other incident that you believe requires the building to be evacuated:

  • Press the nearest Manual Call Point (RED boxes) to set off the alarm or telephone 112233 (internal) or 999 (external).
  • Make your way out of the building.
  • Report to the Porters lodge at the main entrance of the building and report to the person-in-charge or Security staff to brief them on what you have found and where it is.  Your information is critical to the safety of others, please make sure you report.

Preparing for Work in Laboratories

Students should be:

  • Briefed by the Faculty about the importance of Health & Safety controls in the workplace, and the student's own responsibilities for Health & Safety.
  • Briefed by their academic supervisor as to:
    • Who has overall responsibility for their Health & Safety
    • Who is the Technical Manager and Area Safety Advisor is for their area of work
    • Who has day to day responsibility for supervising them in the laboratory
    • The work activities involved and any associated significant risks, including the risk assessment documentation
    • Any necessary Health & Safety instructions and training
    • Who to contact if they have serious concerns about their Health & Safety whilst working in a Faculty Laboratory

Working in the Laboratories

Students must comply with the local rules which govern the laboratories. This and other safety information can be found clearly displayed on the Health & Safety notice boards in each of these areas. A copy of these rules can be obtained from the technician responsible for the laboratory or the laboratory manager.

In laboratories and workshops you are likely to find yourself surrounded by potentially hazardous machinery and equipment that you are unfamiliar with.

All students, within the context of their knowledge, have a duty to:

  • Not work in laboratories or workshops outside normal hours (8am to 5pm).
  • Never work alone; there should be a minimum of two students working together at any one time.
  • Keep alert, both in your own actions and in knowing what those around you are doing – Laboratories and workshops are no places for horseplay.
  • Wear sensible and comfortable clothing and shoes. Take of coats and scarves and remove anything which hangs loose which may get caught in machinery. Do not wear light shoes or sandals.
  • Read, understand and follow all written Safety Instructions and Notices.
  • Obey all verbal safety instructions
  • Do NOT bring food and drink into any laboratory
  • Report to a member of staff (academic or technical) any matters that may affect the safety of those using the facilities.

Risk Assessments

1st & 2nd Year Undergraduates

Students attending laboratory classes in their 1st & 2nd Years, will not be required to write risk assessments as this will have already been done by the academic responsible for the class. It is the responsibility of the academic supervisor to ensure that students are briefed on any potential hazards and to ensure that adequate training / supervision is provided, however it is also your responsibility to read the relevant risk assessment for the class.

3rd & 4th Year Undergraduates and All Postgraduates

Undergraduate or Postgraduate students who are involved in research projects in the laboratories, must write Risk Assessments and COSHH assessments appropriate to their experiment for which the academic supervisor is responsible for signing this off before activities can commence. The ASA and the laboratory manager will also sign these off in an advisory capacity. These assessments should be available to view at all times and reviewed on a regular basis to reflect any changes in experimental procedures. Advice is available from the Laboratory Manager or the technician responsible for the laboratory. Guidance and templates for completing risk assessments can be found on the following website: www.bristol.ac.uk/engineering/health-safety/index.html

All Students

Students must not attempt to use any test machine or associated equipment before appropriate training has taken place. This can be organised with the Laboratory Manager or the Technician responsible for the laboratory.

Monitoring and Review

Students should be effectively supported during their work in the laboratories. It is good practice for academic supervisors and suitably experienced technical staff to visit students regularly during their time in the laboratory to monitor and review their progress. This provides a useful opportunity to ask students if they have any Health & Safety concerns and discuss practical ways in which risks are controlled.

Students should be debriefed following their experience of working in the laboratories. This is another opportunity for Health & Safety knowledge to be reinforced, and for students to raise any Health & Safety concerns.

First Aid

First Aiders are provided during normal working hours.  The names of people trained to treat others are shown around the building on GREEN first aid signs/posters.  The contact number for each person is shown on the poster.  Telephone the number shown.  If for whatever reason you are unable to contact anyone on the list then contact the Estates Assistants (number shown on signs) or dial 112233 (internal) or 999 (external) for assistance.

Security

For entrance to Engineering buildings you will be required to show your student ID card.  Other University buildings may operate this procedure, but even for buildings where this is not the case, you must get into the habit of carrying your ID card with you at all times whilst you are on University premises as you may still be challenged by Security or Portering or other members of staff and require the card to exit any building.  If when challenged you are not able to prove your identity you may well be prevented from entering a building.  Please do not be offended if you are asked to show/provide ID.  This is required of everyone to ensure your safety and security.

The U-Card system is in various locations within the Engineering buildings. Local U-Card Administrators (LUCA) are located in the School Offices to give local access requirements to staff and students – please enquire in your School Office.  To obtain additional access rights you will be required to fill in a form (School Office) and have your requirements agreed to by your tutor/course supervisor.  The LUCA will then be able to add these requirements to your ID card.  ALWAYS CARRY YOUR ID CARD WITH YOU.

You are advised not to leave personal items unattended, as thefts have been known to take place.  The Faculty has a very limited number of lockers available in Queen's Building and if you are interested in having the use of one of these for the year please enquire at the Faculty Office, Room 1.43 Queen's Building.  A deposit will be required and keys should be returned at the end of each academic year.

Secure cycle and motorcycle racks are provided in various places around the University, but cycles and motorcycles are left at your own risk.

The Security Office should be informed of any actual or attempted thefts, other criminal incidents or suspect behaviour that you observe in the University.  If you see anything please phone 112233 (internal) to report the incident.

Examinations & Assessment Procedures

Examination Periods

The summative assessment of units must take place during or at the end of the teaching block in which the unit is run, except for agreed exceptions.  Summative examinations will be set within the January and May/June assessment periods.  Resit examinations may only be set in the August/September period.

Main examination periods for the 2019-20 academic year

January Examination Period 13 January 2020 – 24 January 2020
Summer Examination Period 18 May 2020 – 15 June 2020
Re-sit and Supplementary Examination Period 24 August 2020 – 4 September 2020

Please make a note of the dates and do not book holidays during the August/ September resit examination period.

All students taking first-sit or re-sit examinations are expected to take their scheduled examinations in Bristol in venues arranged by the central University of Bristol Examinations Office (or by the Faculty).  

The sitting of an examination outside the UK is not an automatic entitlement and permission will only be given where it is determined that a student has an exceptional reason why they should not sit the examination in the UK.  A student being on holiday or working overseas at the time of the examination will not be considered a good reason for taking the examination outside the UK. Authorisation to sit an examination outside the UK will not usually be given where the request is made on medical grounds as students should only be taking examinations when fit to do so. Students wishing to submit a request to sit exams overseas should read the University’s policy on sitting exams abroad (which can be found at: www.bristol.ac.uk/directory/exams/outside-uk/) and then submit the relevant form (available at that weblink) to their School Office.

Please note that students from another institution (e.g. on the incoming Erasmus or Study Abroad scheme) are not permitted a resit, given that this failure will be reconciled by their home institution.

Calculators in Examinations

The Engineering Faculty Board has adopted regulations to permit the use of only certain types of calculator in examinations. Only calculators carrying the appropriate will seal will be allowed in exams and progress tests.  The seal is in the form of a destructible sticky label which is attached to the calculator. It is designed to be an easily visible 'badge' to facilitate invigilators' recognition of approved calculators during exams.

Seals are issued free of charge from the Faculty Office, Room 1.43, Queens Building.  This is a picture of a sample seal:

It is a disciplinary offence for a student to take a calculator into an exam or progress test if the calculator is not sealed. Candidates doing this are cheating and will be dealt with under the appropriate regulations.

The following list (available online (Amazon) and on the high street (WH Smith, Ryman, Wilkinson’s) represents a list of calculators which meet the Faculty of Engineering requirements  for the use of calculators in exams, provided they also carry a seal.

VERY IMPORTANT NOTE: A seal will only be applied to calculators which have the exact model numbers (shown below) printed on the front of the calculator.  No additional letters may follow the model number.  (If buying online there may be additional letters to denote colour etc. Please check the picture of the calculator before buying, to make sure it has the exact model number as shown below). 

Approved Calculators (recommended calculators in bold)

Make Model Make Model
Aurora AX582BL
AX582PK
AX595PK
AX595TV

Sharp

EL-531X
EL-531XG
EL-531XH
EL-W531
EL-W531G
EL-W531H
EL-W531HA
EL-W531X
EL-W531XG
EL-W531XH
EL-W535X
Casio

fx82-ES
fx83-ES
fx83-GT Plus

fx83-GTX
fx85-ES
fx85-GT Plus

fx85-GTX
fx300-ES
fx350-ES

Texas Instruments TI-30 eco RS
TI-30 X IIB
TI-30 X IIS
TI-30 Xa
TI-30 XB
TI-30 XS
TI-34
HP SmartCalc 300s Wilkinsons DS701-MS


IMPORTANT NOTE: A seal will only be applied to calculators which have the exact model numbers (shown below) printed on the front of the calculator.  No additional letters may follow the model number.
  (If buying online there may be additional letters to denote colour etc, but you must check the picture of the calculator before buying, to check it has the exact model number as shown below)

Programmes, units and credits

All students in the University are registered on a programme of study within the University, which lead on to the award of a degree.  The programmes consist of a number of units, each of which has a number of credits associated with them.  Each year, undergraduates are required to pass 120 credits (or 130 if required by your Programme Specification) of units to be allowed to progress to the next year of study (though additional hurdles may also be specified). 

Undergraduate students will not be permitted to study more than 120 or 130 credit points in total per year.  The University will make additional charges for units taken in excess of programme requirements.

Unit choices

Students are asked to confirm their option choices (if their programme of study for the year includes optional units) at the beginning of each academic year. Once students have confirmed their option choices, they cannot make changes to these unless there is an exceptional reason, and the change will need the approval of their Programme Director. 

Passing units

To pass a unit and gain its credit you need an overall assessment mark greater than the minimum pass mark (40% in undergraduate units, 50% for level 7 or M, units).   Please also see the further information on processing and recording of marks in the regulations:-

The assessment of a unit may be by an examination (held in January or May/June) or coursework submitted during the year, or a combination of both.  All units should explicitly state their assessments, when they are due, and the weighting given to them at the beginning of the academic year. The mark awarded for the unit is the weighted average of all assessments including examinations.

You are required by the University Regulations to attend all compulsory classes and to undertake written coursework as prescribed.  Credit points may be withheld if you do not comply with these requirements.  Some activities may be specified as “must pass” or “must attend” and you must pass or attend these activities in order to obtain the credit points for that unit. 

IMPORTANT: You must account for any absence from these activities, especially for Examinations - see www.bristol.ac.uk/academic-quality/assessment/regulations-and-code-of-practice-for-taught-programmes/student-absence/.

Failure to obtain credit in a unit may ultimately result in you being required to withdraw from the Faculty.

Marking Criteria and Scales

Information on marking criteria and scales is available in Section 14 of the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes.

Important Information about the conduct of examinations

Please note that you are required to comply with University Regulations regarding conduct and behaviour during exams.   Please note that you should not bring anything to your desk in the exam room that is not permitted, even blank paper (rough work must be done in the answer booklet that is provided and then crossed through to indicate that it should not be marked).  It is your responsibility to read the further information about conduct of formal examinations in Section 2 of the University Examination Regulations.  This includes, amongst other important things, information on late arrivals at the examinations and cheating.

Alternative Study and Examination Arrangements

It is difficult to make extra time arrangements for tests taking place within lecture slots. Our experience is that the nature of these tests is such that lack of time is rarely an issue for any students when completing the tests. However, if a student with an approved extra time entitlement considers that they have been adversely affected by not having the extra time for such a test, they should raise this with the unit organiser as soon as possible after the test.

Please see the section on applying for Alternative Arrangements in this handbook.

Progression and Awards

Progression means the mechanism by which students are permitted to move on to either a higher year of study for their programme or in the case of postgraduate taught programmes the final project. 

Please see Appendices 2-6 for guidance on progression:-

Please also note that the definitive requirements are set out in Section 30 University's Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes.

At the end of your programme, your final award is calculated in accordance with:-

Re-sitting Examinations and Assessments

Terminology: The term "resit" refers to a second attempt at an assessment previously failed, while the term "supplementary assessment" refers to an assessment as a first attempt due to extenuating circumstances affecting a previous attempt.

You are expected to pass your assessments at the first attempt.  The university makes the concession to you that should you fail at the first attempt, you have an opportunity to take resits in order to demonstrate a minimum level of competence (as long as you have passed units worth at least 40 credit points at the first attempt for undergraduate programmes or 60 credit points for postgraduate taught programmes).  Should you fail to pass the resit then normally you will be required to withdraw from the University.

Resits may take place in August/September, or in the following academic year if you are permitted to register on a Supplementary (Resit) Year.  You are required to be available for the resits, and no account will be made in timetabling them in relation to the availability of individual students.

Students who are eligible for resits and have failures in units totalling 60 credit points or less, will take their resit examinations and submit any resit coursework in August/September.  The assessment of some units has contributions from continuous assessment, together with one or more written papers.  The format of the resit or supplementary assessment may be different from the original form of assessment.  In general, a student will be required to re-sit one or more major components of the original assessment according to his or her performance.  However, the marks from different components of first attempt assessments will not be taken into account when calculating the resit mark.  This is not the case for students on the Supplementary (Resit) Year who need to re-do the entire unit, including every component of the assessment, from scratch.  We recommend that undergraduate students who fail 70 credits or more should not take resits in August/September but should take the Supplementary (Resit) Year.  However, students in this position can opt to take resits in August/September, but this would be at their own risk and against the advice of the Faculty.

Please note that once a resit or supplementary assessment has been permitted, the new mark is the one that counts, and it will not be possible to revert to the original mark should this prove to be higher than the resit or supplementary mark.

Supplementary assessments will not be allowed for units that students have already passed.  Where the mark of a unit is less than that which might have been expected owing to extenuating circumstances, then this will be noted and considered during the process of making an award.

Supplementary (Resit) Year

The supplementary year is available in modular undergraduate programmes and also in taught postgraduate programmes where there are extenuating circumstances but only exceptionally because of academic failure.

The Faculty of Engineering recommend that students failing 70 credits or more by the time of the June examination board take the "Supplementary Year" rather than resits in September.  In addition, some students will be permitted to register for the "Supplementary Year" due to extenuating circumstances during the August/September resit period which have already been submitted and considered by the Extenuating Circumstances Committee (see section on Extenuating Circumstances). Finally, students failing resit(s) worth 20 credits or less in September may register for the "Supplementary Year" in order to have one final attempt at the failed units but only if they have not already taken a supplementary year.

Students on the Supplementary Year will re-sit the examinations in either January or May/June depending on whether the unit is taught in Teaching Block 1 or Teaching Block 2 (or across both teaching blocks).  The examination will be the same as is set for non-repeating students in that cohort, using the preparatory material provided during teaching sessions. If the programme structure has changed since the previous academic year, then students may need to take different units to those they have just failed. Students on the Supplementary Year who are successful in passing the failed units will then re-join their programme in September in the next year of study.   They therefore take an extra year to complete their degree.

Students on the Supplementary Year need to re-do all labs and coursework and still need to meet with their tutor.  Marks for units where a resit (not supplementary 1st attempt) is required are capped at 40% and if you fail these, then you will be required to withdraw (unless you have not yet had your final attempt at failed resits worth 20 credits or less).  Students registered on the Supplementary Year who are repeating units as a supplementary/first attempt, will normally be allowed to take resits again in August/September if they fail in June.

Students on the Supplementary Year will be required to fully engage with the failed units through standard attendance and re-do all coursework, labs and progress tests.  These students are also still required to meet with their Personal Tutor on a regular basis.  A pro-rata fee will be payable according to how many credit points they are registered for.

If the failed unit(s) are only taught over one teaching block, then students will need to register for a voluntary unit in the other teaching block if they wish to retain full student status.  Fees will be payable for the voluntary unit.  It may be possible to suspend study during the appropriate teaching block, but home students should take advice from the Student Funding Office for any implications on their loan, and International St

Classification (undergraduate programmes only)

Classification is the process by which the University determines your final degree result.  It does this by combining the overall year mark for the final year with those for all the years after the first year using the published weightings for your programme (see below).  The final year is treated differently from previous years as the Faculty has taken the power provided by the University to treat the final year as a single, 120 credit block.  What this means is that to graduate, you must only pass the year as a whole and you are not required to pass all the units.  However, the Faculty requires (and will continue to require) that all honours degree graduates must have successfully completed a major project.

No final year resits (i.e. second attempts) are offered by the Faculty.  The only exception is the project as this is a "must-pass" unit, and therefore students are permitted one resit opportunity in this unit.  Students who miss a final year exam through illness will be required to take this as a first attempt in the August/September resit period and therefore will not graduate in July.

University Classification Rules (undergraduate programmes only)

Both the Final Year and Penultimate Year of the programme must be taken and completed to an acceptable standard before an accredited degree may be awarded. The award and class of degree will depend on the overall mark and this is calculated using a weighted combination of a student's year marks as set out in the table below:

Degree Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5
Meng 10% 40% 50% -
MEng + Study in Europe/Abroad 15% 10% 75% -
BEng 25% 75% - -
BSc 25% 75% - -
MEng in Engineering Design + Study in Industry 10% 10% 30% 50%
BEng in Engineering Design + Study in Industry 15% 10% 75%  
MEng with direct entry into year 3 - 45% 55% -

Degree Class Boundaries (undergraduate programmes only)

The programme classification boundary ranges are based on marks out of 100 and are:

Degree Boundary
2.1/1 Equal to or more than 68, but less than 70
2.2/2.1 Equal to or more than 58, but less than 60
3/2.2 Equal to or more than 48, but less than 50
Fail/3 Equal to or more than 38, but less than 40

If the final summative programme mark falls within the range of one of the classification boundaries above, the higher degree classification will only be awarded if 50% or more of the individual weighted unit marks that contribute to the degree classification are achieved at the higher class, otherwise the lower class will be awarded.  This is called the "secondary rule".

Further information can be found in Section 32 of the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes.

Appendix 11 of the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes contains some examples of degree class calculations using the “secondary rule”. Please note the information in section 31 of the Code (and Appendix 11) is definitive, but two more examples are given below for illustrative purposes only

Student A

Achieves a final degree mark of 59 based on 2nd year mark of 63 (25% weighting) and 3rd year mark of 57 (75% weighting) and is therefore on the classification boundary between 2.2 and 2.1.

In 2nd year has 110 credits at the higher level (i.e. at 2.1 or 1st standard)

In 3rd year has 60 credits at the higher level

Year 2: 110 x 25 (number of credits at higher level x weight for year) = 2750

Year 3: 60 x 75 = 4500

    • Add the number of weighted credit points at the higher level together: 2750 +4500 = 7250
    • Divide by 100 = 72.5
    • The above figure of 72.5 is then normalised to one year of study (120 credit points). As the figure is above 60 credits, then it equals more than 50% of weighted credits at the higher level and the award is a 2.1 

Student B

Achieves a final degree mark of 58 based on 2nd year mark of 64 (25% weighting) and 3rd year mark of 56 (75% weighting) and is therefore on the classification boundary between 2.2 and 2.1.

In 2nd year has 70 credits at the higher level (i.e. at 2.1 or 1st standard)

In 3rd year has 50 credits at the higher level

Year 2: 70 x 25 (number of credits at higher level x weight for year) = 1750

Year 3: 50 x 75 = 3750

    • Add the number of weighted credit points at the higher level together: 1750 + 3750 = 5500
    • Divide by 100 = 55
    • The above figure of 55 is then normalised to one year of study (120 credit points). As the figure is below 60 credits, then it does not equal more than 50% of weighted credits at the higher level and the award is a 2.2

Please note the examples above are based on cases where students have taken 120 credit points per year.  Where students have taken more than 120 credit points in a year there are rules for what can be included and counted in the weightings for the year:

  • Students will normally be assessed in a combination of mandatory and option units such that the total credit points for the year of study do not exceed that required by the degree programme (normally 120).
  • Some programmes (e.g. programmes with Study in Continental Europe) require, or allow for, 130 credit points in some years of study.
  • If a student takes more than the required number of credit points for their programme on a voluntary basis, they may be required to pay a fee for the additional units and the credit/marks accumulated may not count towards their final award - please see guidelines below.

Guidelines on when credits are included and counted in assessment (undergraduate programmes only)

130 credits are included and counted in the assessment for the year and no extra pro-rata tuition fee is charged when a student is specifically required or allowed to take 130 credits by the specification of the programme they are following, such as when:

  • Students are taking a language as part of their programme with “Study in Continental Europe”
  • International students are taking English Language as part of their first-year studies

Only 120 credits are included and counted in the assessment for the year, but no extra pro-rata tuition fee is charged when a student is specifically required or allowed to take an additional unit by the specification of the programme they are following, or when:

  • Students only have 10 credits of open unit choice and wish to take a 20-credit unit.  In these circumstances, only 10 credits out of the 20-credit unit will be counted for assessment
  • Students choose the language option when it is included in a named list of option choices, and the number of credits for the year does not exceed 130

The University discourages students from taking more than the number of credits stipulated in their programme specification each year.

Examination Boards

Progression and classification decisions are made by Examination boards. The Examination Boards meet in February, June, September and November (for postgraduate programmes only) in order to make progression and classification decisions. Initial decisions are made by departmental examination boards, which consist of all the examiners within a department.  All final decisions about progression and classification are made by the Faculty Examination Board, which meets shortly after the departmental examination boards.  Assessment results are published as soon as possible after the Faculty Examination Board meetings.  Examination Boards will also meet after the January assessment period to approve the marks.  Progression decisions will only be made where these are possible after only the Teaching Block 1 units have been completed.

All discussions are anonymous, and your personal circumstances are not revealed to examination boards.  For each department, a small Extenuating Circumstances Committee (ECC) is formed.  These consider all the mitigating circumstances that have been submitted over the year and determine their extent and severity.  These are reported to the examination boards, without reference to the particular circumstances, during their meetings to ensure that a fair result is arrived at.

Certificates and Diplomas

Undergraduate programmes: Regulations exist to allow the award of Certificates & Diplomas of Higher Education for students who withdraw from the University or are required to withdraw before completion of their programme of study.

  • To be eligible for a Certificate of Higher Education the student must have completed at least one year of study and achieved an overall mark for the year of at least 40.
  • To be eligible for a Diploma of Higher Education the student must have completed at least two years of study and achieved an overall mark for the second year of at least 40.

The award of the Certificate/Diploma is at the discretion of the Faculty Board. Once a Certificate or Diploma has been awarded, students cannot transfer the credit points to any other programme of study, either at Bristol or elsewhere unless the Certificate or Diploma is surrendered. These awards do not count towards any accreditation by an engineering institution.

Postgraduate programmes

Postgraduate Diploma: For a Postgraduate Diploma, 120 credit points are required.  At least 90 of the 120 credit points must be from units at Level 7 (Level M).  These credit points must be obtained from the taught component only and not from the major dissertation.  The project unit credits cannot be counted towards a Diploma. 

In the event of a failure in a single unit or multiple units, the Board of Examiners (normally the Department Board, ratified by the Faculty) MAY exercise its discretion and award credit points, up to a maximum of 20, in the taught component. 

Students who receive a Postgraduate Diploma do not attend the graduation ceremony.

Postgraduate Certificate: For a Postgraduate Certificate, 60 credit points are required.  These credit points must be obtained from the taught component only and not from the major dissertation.  At least 40 of the 60 credit points must be from units at Level 7 (Level M).

In the event of a failure in a single 10 credit point unit, the Board of Examiners (normally the Department Board, ratified by the Faculty) MAY exercise its discretion and award the credit points.

Students who receive a Postgraduate Certificate do not attend the graduation ceremony.

 

Additional Support Available

If you experience difficulties with your study, then it is important to tell us about them as soon as possible.

If your difficulties relate to academic matters, then please bring these to the attention of your Personal Tutor or the member of staff who is teaching the unit.  If this is not suitable, then the Programme Director (see list of contacts in Appendix 1) or Head of Department might be approached.

For all other concerns, talk to someone…

Residential Life Advisors   Available if you are in University accommodation for a range of issues including homesickness, problems with your flatmates, or other wellbeing concerns. www.bristol.ac.uk/students/wellbeing/services/residential-life-service/

Student Wellbeing Service  You can talk to a student wellbeing adviser about any wellbeing concern. They will listen and help you find the right support.  Wellbeing Advisors are in each of the School Offices. www.bristol.ac.uk/students/wellbeing/services/student-wellbeing-service/

Just Ask  This Students' Union service can help with academic issues such as appeals and signpost you to external services. www.bristolsu.org.uk/advice-and-support

Tell us anonymously  Bullying, harassment, assault and discrimination are not acceptable. If you see something you don't like, report it using our Report and Support tool.

For further support and advice please see information available at; www.bristol.ac.uk/students/wellbeing/services/

Complaints and Appeals

We try very hard to take decisions which are fair and take account of the personal circumstances. Inevitably, however, we sometimes make mistakes and sometimes you will simply disagree with a decision. For this reason, the University has a system for dealing with student complaints and appeals. Before starting any formal process of appeal, it is important that all informal means available within the Faculty are exhausted (although you need to watch for the deadlines for the formal process as well). This means that you should try to seek a resolution within your School before involving either the Undergraduate or Graduate Education Director. For example, if you are not happy with a decision of a Board of Examiners you should seek clarification in the first instance from the Chair of that School Board and take advice from your Personal Tutor. Disputes can often be resolved in this way.

You can contact ‘Just Ask’, the Bristol Students’ Union’s Advice and Representation Centre for confidential, independent advice on complaints or appeals, and any other issues you might encounter during your time at University. Visit them at www.bristolsu.org.uk/justask/ or email bristolsu-justask@bristol.ac.uk for more information or see their Guide to Academic Appeals.

Many appeals arise out of the examination process, in which case you should familiarise yourself with the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught programmes and the procedure and rules set out in Section 7 of the University Examination Regulations.

Disagreement about the quality of your work or the marks awarded is not a ground for appeal. All scripts have gone through a considerable quality assurance process, including the use of experts from other Universities as external examiners. Appeals must be made within 15 working days of the date of the letter or other notification of the decision against which the student is appealing, by sending the official form www.bris.ac.uk/secretary/studentrulesregs/examregs.html to the Faculty Education Manager via engf-fem@bristol.ac.uk 

Appealing against a decision of a Board of Examiners

It is possible to appeal the decision of the examination boards; however, the grounds on which appeals can be made are limited as are the remedies available.  It is nearly always in your interest to tell us about problems as they occur, not after things go wrong in assessments.  Please see further details about appeals.

Please note that complaints about teaching can only be considered for determining progression and examination if they were raised at the time the problem occurred.  No account from the point of view of examination results can be taken of complaints received after they have been published. Please see the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes for further details on how to appeal a decision made by a Board of Examiners.

Technical Support for Undergraduate Projects

The Faculty is committed to supporting students to produce the highest quality undergraduate projects during their studies at the University of Bristol. The following guidelines have been introduced to clarify the support available, to ensure equity of support available to all students, to enable the timely delivery of projects to meet submission deadlines, and to maximise usage of the facilities across the Faculty.

Technical Support

To ensure all students have equal access to technical support the following guidelines are in place:

  • 5 days of technical preparation and support time
  • 3 days of workshop machining
  • 3 days of electrical workshop support
  • 5 days of test machine time for high demand shared facilities

Where it is felt that these guidelines will be exceeded by an individual project, projects will be referred to Heads of Department.

Timescales

In order to effectively manage workloads (both of individual students and of the Technical Services), it is expected that project work will commence during Teaching Block 1.

On average work submitted to the workshops will take 3 to 4 weeks to manufacture, for students wishing to undertake testing this should be factored into project planning. Students should be aware that the University closes for approximately 2 weeks at the end of December/ start of January, and therefore timescales will be affected during this period.

Clear deadlines are in place for the submission of work to labs and workshops. While staff will endeavour to support all work wherever possible, work submitted after these dates may not be delivered in time to meet project deadlines and is done at your own risk.

Final Technical Deadlines

  • Deadline for submission to workshop for machining 1 month before work submission deadline 
  • Deadline for booking test machines, 1 month before work submission deadline

Facilities

The Faculty supports a broad range of teaching and research laboratories and workshops; these facilities are available to students to provide the opportunity for hands-on learning to support your project work. An overview of what’s available at: Technical services

The student workshop has been created as a dedicated space in the Queen’s building to enable students the opportunity to work in a safe and managed environment during your studies, with equipment and materials provided. Further details of what is available is at: Student workshop.

Please note, for some equipment it is necessary to undertake training before access will be permitted, for full details of how this can be arranged please speak to the technician responsible for the area.

Data Protection

The University is required to process student personal data in order to function effectively as an educational institution and to provide students with the support they require while undertaking their studies.

Personal data is processed for a variety of reasons as set out on the Student Fair Processing Notice and all such personal data shall be collected and held in accordance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the Data Protection Act 2018.

All matters relating to a student's career at the University are strictly confidential and may not be relayed to other parties, including parents, without the express permission of the individual student (i.e. in writing).

Appendices

Appendix 1. Key contacts in the Faculty of Engineering

SCEEM - School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Engineering Mathematics

Visit us:   The School Office is in the Merchant Venturers Building. Enter through the main entrance on Woodland Road, and the School Office is located immediately in front of you on the other side of the social/café space in room 2.19.

Call us:  You can call the School Office on 0117 331 5663 to speak to administrators for all programmes.

Email us: 

CAME – School of Civil, Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering 

Visit us: The School Office in the Queen's Building. Enter through the main entrance on University Walk, pass through the security barriers, and turn right. The School Office reception desk is located in room 0.16a.

Call us: You can call the School Office on 0117 394 0408 to speak to administrators for all programmes.

Email us: 

Undergraduate contacts

Department/ Programme Programme Director Senior Tutor Examinations Officer
Aerospace Engineering Steve Bullock Steve Burrow

Luiz Kawashita and Terence Macquart

Civil Engineering Paul Vardanega Laura Dickinson John Macdonald
Computer Science Neill Campbell David Bernhard John Cartlidge
Electrical & Electronic Engineering Angela Doufexi Simon Armour George Oikonomou
Engineering Design Paul Harper Laura Dickinson tbc

Engineering Mathematics

Martin Homer Oscar Benjamin Mike Jeffrey

Mechanical Engineering

Irina Lazar Becky Selwyn (yr 1), Andrew Harrison (yr 2), Joel Ross (Yr 3) and Irene Renaud-Assemat (Yr 4) Mark Gilbertson

Postgraduate contacts

Department Programme Director  Exams Officer  Senior Tutor 

MSc Computer Science Conversion 

Andrew Calway Majid Mirmehdi Paul O'Dowd

MSc Advanced Computing - Machine Learning, Data Mining and High-Performance Computing 

Andrew Calway  Majid Mirmehdi  Paul O'Dowd 

MSc Advanced Computing  

Andrew Calway Majid Mirmehdi Paul O'Dowd  

MSc Biomedical Engineering 

Alin Achim Dimitris Agrafiotis

MSc Wireless Communications and Signal Processing 

Martin Cryan Dimitris Agrafiotis

MSc Optical Communications and Signal Processing 

Martin Cryan Dimitris Agrafiotis

MSc Communication Network and Signal Processing 

Martin Cryan Dimitris Agrafiotis

MSc Image and Videos Communications and Signal Processing 

Martin Cryan Dimitris Agrafiotis

MSc Advanced Microelectronic Systems Engineering 

Jose Nunez-Yanez

Dimitris Agrafiotis

MSc Engineering Mathematics 

Luca Giuggioli 

Colin Campbell

MSc Robotics 

Helmut Hauser  Colin Campbell

MSc Advanced Composites 

Byung Chul Kim/Dmitry Ivanov   Luiz Kawashita Byung Chul Kim/Dmitry Ivanov 

MSc Earthquake Engineering and Infrastructure Resilience 

Anastasios Sextos John Macdonald  Anastasios Sextos / Laura Dickinson 

MSc Water and Environmental Management 

Ross Woods  John Macdonald  Ross Woods/Laura Dickinson 

 

 

Appendix 2. First Year Progression

Section 30 of the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes (the Code) outline the regulations for the award of credit for purposes of progression. Please refer to this in association with the following information which gives a basic outline of the criteria for progression into the second year: www.bristol.ac.uk/academic-quality/assessment/regulations-and-code-of-practice-for-taught-programmes/student-progression-ug-modular/

    1. The First Year must be completed before entry into the Second Year by gaining 120 credit points in the units of the First Year (or 130 credit points if the Programme Specification requires this).
    2. A student who is not awarded credits for a unit at the first attempt should normally be permitted a second attempt (resit), but this is only permitted if the student has achieved a pass mark in at least a third of the credit points for the year (i.e. 40 credits) at the first attempt.
    3. A pass mark is 40 for level 4-6 (C-H) units.
    4. If a student does not achieve a pass mark in at least 40 credits at the first attempt, s/he will be required to withdraw from the programme unless there are validated extenuating circumstances (see section on Medical and Other Extenuating Circumstances).
    5. A student who fails at the first attempt to achieve the pass mark in unit/s with a maximum value of 20 credit points, may be permitted to progress as long as they have:
      • Obtained an overall year assessment mark >= 40% *
      • Obtained a pass mark in units whose total credit value is at least 100 credit points (110 credit points if taking 130 credit points).
      • A mark >= 35% for each of the remaining units (Compensated Pass). (The award of a Compensated Pass for a unit from outside the Faculty will be at the discretion of that Faculty)
    6. A compensated pass will not be awarded if a student is taking the assessment for a unit as a second attempt (resit).
    7. Normally only one resit attempt is allowed unless there are validated extenuating circumstances.  However, if a student fails to achieve a pass mark following a re-sit of the unit(s) equating to 20 credit points or less, s/he will be permitted a final opportunity to be re-assessed, normally as part of a Supplementary Year.  A student will only be permitted to take a Supplementary Year for this reason once.

Please refer to the Flowchart for Year 1 Progression (PDF, 125kB) which illustrates the above information.

*Please note that an overall year assessment mark >= 55% (plus >= 55% in Maths if required by the relevant Department) is required for progression to the second year of a degree programme with Study in Continental Europe. If students on these programmes do not meet these requirements, they will be required to transfer to the Bristol MEng programme.

All outstanding debts must be paid before registration on a subsequent year is accepted.

Appendix 3. Second Year BEng/BSc Progression

Section 30 of the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes (the Code) outlines the regulations for the award of credit for purposes of progression. Please refer to this in association with the following information which gives a basic outline of the criteria for progression into the third year of a BEng/BSc programme.

  1. The Second Year must be completed before entry into the Third Year by gaining 120 credit points in the units of the First Year (or 130 credit points if the Programme Specification requires this).
  2. A student who is not awarded credits for a unit at the first attempt should normally be permitted a second attempt (resit), but this is only permitted if the student has achieved a pass mark in at least a third of the credit points for the year (i.e. 40 credits) at the first attempt.
  3. A pass mark is 40 for level 4-6 (C-H) units.
  4. If a student does not achieve a pass mark in at least 40 credits at the first attempt, s/he will be required to withdraw from the programme unless there are validated extenuating circumstances (see section on Medical and Other Extenuating Circumstances).
  5. A student who fails at the first attempt to achieve the pass mark in unit/s with a maximum value of 20 credit points, may be permitted to progress as long as they have:
    • Obtained an overall year assessment mark >= 40%
    • Obtained a pass mark in units whose total credit value is at least 100 credit points (110 credit points if taking 130 credit points).
    • A mark >= 35% for each of the remaining units (Compensated Pass). (The award of a Compensated Pass for a unit from outside the Faculty will be at the discretion of that Faculty).
  6. A compensated pass will not be awarded if a student is taking the assessment for a unit as a second attempt (resit).
  7. Normally only one resit attempt is allowed unless there are validated extenuating circumstances.   However, if a student fails to achieve a pass mark following a re-sit of the unit(s) equating to 20 credit points or less, s/he will be permitted a final opportunity to be re-assessed, normally as part of a Supplementary Year.   However, a student will only be permitted to take a Supplementary Year for this reason once, so this option will not be open to any student who has already taken a supplementary year.

Please refer to the Flowchart for Year 2 BEng and BSc progression (PDF, 124kB) which illustrates the above information. 

All outstanding debts must be paid before registration on a subsequent year is accepted.

Appendix 4. Second Year MEng Progression

Section 30 of the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes (the Code) outlines the regulations for the award of credit for purposes of progression. Please refer to this in association with the following information which gives a basic outline of the criteria for progression into the third year of an MEng programme.

  1. A student must gain an overall mark of at least 50% for the year in order to progress to the third year of an MEng programme.*
  2. The second year must be completed before entry into the third year by gaining 120 credit points in the units of the Second Year (or 130 credit points if the Programme Specification requires this).
  3. A student who is not awarded credits for a unit at the first attempt should normally be permitted a second attempt (resit), but this is only permitted if the student has achieved a pass mark in at least a third of the credit points for the year (i.e. 40 credits) at the first attempt.
  4. A pass mark is 40 for level 4-6 (C-H) units.
  5. If a student does not achieve a pass mark in at least 40 credits at the first attempt, s/he will be required to withdraw from the programme unless there are validated extenuating circumstances (see section on Medical and Other Extenuating Circumstances).
  6. A student who fails at the first attempt to achieve the pass mark in unit/s with a maximum value of 20 credit points, may be permitted to progress as long as they have:
  • Obtained an overall year assessment mark >= 40%
  • Obtained a pass mark in units whose total credit value is at least 100 credit points (110 credit points if taking 130 credit points).
  • A mark >= 35% for each of the remaining units (Compensated Pass). (The award of a Compensated Pass for a unit from outside the Faculty will be at the discretion of that Faculty).
  1. A compensated pass will not be awarded if a student is taking the assessment for a unit as a second attempt (resit).
  2. Normally only one resit attempt is allowed unless there are validated extenuating circumstances.   However, if a student fails to achieve a pass mark following a re-sit of the unit(s) equating to 20 credit points or less, s/he will be permitted a final opportunity to be re-assessed, normally as part of a Supplementary Year.   However, a student will only be permitted to take a Supplementary Year for this reason once, so this option will not be open to any student who has already taken a supplementary year.

Please refer to the Flowchart for Year 2 MEng progression (PDF, 124kB) which illustrates the above information.

* A student may be required to satisfy additional criteria and must achieve the proscribed year mark at the first attempt, before being allowed to proceed to the Third Year of an MEng with Study in Continental Europe/Study Abroad degree programme. A student not satisfying these criteria will be required to transfer to the Bristol MEng programme (if they have achieved an overall mark of at least 50 for the year) or the equivalent BEng/BSc programme.

If after resits a student fails to satisfy the conditions for progression on the MEng in Engineering Design with Study in Industry programme then the placement will not form part of the Engineering Design degree and the student would normally leave the placement and proceed immediately to the third year of the BEng in Engineering Design programme, providing the conditions for progression to BEng had been satisfied. However, the employer and employee can agree to continue with the placement on the basis that it will not count towards the student's degree so that the student takes a year out before returning to take the third year of the BEng in Engineering Design programme.

All outstanding debts must be paid before registration on a subsequent year is accepted.

Appendix 5. Third Year MEng Progression (and Fourth Year H150 Progression)

Section 30 of the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes (the Code) outlines the regulations for the award of credit for purposes of progression. Please refer to this in association with the following information which gives a basic outline of the criteria for progression into the fourth year of an MEng programme.

  1. A student must gain an overall mark of at least 50% for the year in order to progress to the fourth year of an MEng programme (or fifth year of H150).
  2. The third year (or 4th year of H150) must be completed before entry into the fourth year (or 5th year H150) by gaining 120 credit points in the units of the Third/Fourth Year (or 130 credit points if the Programme Specification requires this).
  3. A student who is not awarded credits for a unit at the first attempt should normally be permitted a second attempt (resit), but this is only permitted if the student has achieved a pass mark in at least a third of the credit points for the year (i.e. 40 credits) at the first attempt.
  4. A pass mark is 40 for level 4-6 (C-H) units and 50 for level 7 (M) units.
  5. If a student does not achieve a pass mark in at least 40 credits at the first attempt, s/he will be required to withdraw from the programme, with an appropriate exit award, unless there are validated extenuating circumstances (see section on Medical and Other Extenuating Circumstances).
  6. A student who fails at the first attempt to achieve a pass mark in unit/s with a maximum value of 20 credit points, may be permitted to progress as long as they have:
    • Obtained an overall year assessment mark >= 40%
    • Obtained a pass mark in units whose total credit value is at least 100 credit points (110 credit points if taking 130 credit points).
    • A mark of >= 35% (non Level 7/M units) or >= 45% (Level 7/M units) for each of the remaining units (Compensated Pass). (The award of a Compensated Pass for a unit from outside the Faculty will be at the discretion of that Faculty).
  7. A compensated pass will not be awarded if a student is taking the assessment for a unit as a second attempt (resit).
  8. Normally only one resit attempt is allowed unless there are validated extenuating circumstances.  However, if a student fails to achieve a pass mark following a re-sit of the unit(s) equating to 20 credit points or less, s/he will be permitted a final opportunity to be re-assessed, normally as part of a Supplementary Year.  However, a student will only be permitted to take a Supplementary Year for this reason once, so this option will not be open to any student who has already taken a supplementary year.
  9. A student who has pass marks in all the units undertaken but has not obtained an overall year assessment mark of at least 50% will be required to transfer to the equivalent BEng or BSc degree and graduate without further study. Students will usually have to attend the next available Graduation Ceremony (usually in February of the following year).  Students in the third year of the MEng in Engineering Design with Study in Industry will be required to undertake further study by taking the third year of the BEng in Engineering Design programme).
  10. A student who has an overall year assessment mark of less than 50% at the first attempt, but who has not achieved pass marks in all the units undertaken will be given the opportunity to take resits in the failed units (as long as a year mark of 50 is possible after resits capped at the pass mark, and they satisfy the criteria for taking resits, see points 3 and 5). 

The progression decision will be taken at the September Examination Board following the resits.  At this stage students will either be:

  1. awarded a qualification depending on their level of attainment e.g. Diploma of Higher Education, Ordinary Degree or Honours Degree. (Note: if a degree is to be awarded, this will be on the basis of the mark achieved at the first attempt)
  2. or will progress to the fourth year of the MEng programme if after resits they have achieved an overall year assessment mark of at least 50%.  (Note: resits taken as a second attempt are capped at the pass mark and the capped mark will be used when calculating the year mark).

Students may elect not to take the resits and to leave with the relevant qualification based on their level of attainment.

Please refer to the Flowchart for Year 3 MEng progression (PDF, 124kB) which illustrates the above information.

All outstanding debts must be paid before registration on a subsequent year is accepted.

Appendix 6. PGT Progression to Project

The February Exam Boards make no decisions on your progression or on whether you will be allowed to retake any failed units.  You may still submit an appeal against a mark or plagiarism penalty.  The Exam Boards at the end of June will decide whether you can continue with your Project, or whether you first need to retake any units, or withdraw from the programme.  Following the June Exam Boards you will also find out whether you will be allowed any compensated passes in units which you have narrowly failed in February or in June.

When the June results have been issued, based on a complete set of your results for the whole year, you will have an opportunity to appeal against your results if you feel that an unfair or incorrect decision has been made.  At this time, you may also appeal against any plagiarism penalty which you feel is unfair or disproportionate. 

In June, your final and approved results for your taught units will be issued via StudentInfo, on or soon after the Faculty Exam Board. You will receive an email (to your University email address) to tell you when your results are available for you to see.

If you pass all your taught units, you will normally proceed straight to Project.  If you fail one or more units, you should read the information below.

If you fail a unit, you may be eligible for a "compensated pass", which means that, in spite of a fail mark, you are deemed to have passed the unit and you do not need to retake it. A compensated pass is only possible when you have:

  • 50% or more for your overall taught mark (all units combined)
  • No more than 30 credits of failed units
  • A mark of at least 45% in the unit in which you are to have a compensated pass (or 35% if the unit is below M level).  

If you fail more than 30 credits, it is not possible to compensate ANY units. So, for example, if you have fail marks of 45%, 42%, 46%, 47% (in 10 credit M-level units and you pass all other units) you will need to re-sit all four failed units, and you will have no compensated passes.

Compensated passes are only possible for first attempts. In September, a second attempt mark of e.g. 49% (or 39% for non-level 7/M units) would be a fail mark.

If you fail any unit you will normally be required to delay work on your Project (on your transcript this will appear as “Re-sit no Project”).  If you choose to work on your Project without your Department's approval you will receive no supervision. 

With or without your Department's approval, if you start your Project you will do so entirely at your own risk, and if you fail your re-sits, your work on your Project will not be marked.

If you are confident that you will be able to work on your Project over the summer at the same time as preparing for - and passing - your re-sits, you may ask for permission to do this.  Further information and instructions on how to make this request will be issued at the point of results release.

Please note that if you have failed more than 10 credits, it is highly unlikely that your request will be granted.

If you are successful in obtaining agreement to start your Project while studying for one or more re-sits, please be advised that you are doing so at your own risk and your Project will not be marked if you fail any of your re-sits.

  • If you fail more than 60 credits and there is no record of validated extenuating circumstances, you will normally be required to withdraw. 
  • If you fail 30 credits or less, you may have up to three compensated passes or you may have a mix of compensated passes and resits. For example if you have fail marks of 45%, 42%, 46% (in three 10cp units but you pass all other units) you will have to retake only one unit (the one you failed with 42%) and you will be given compensated passes in the other two units. 

If you have to retake any unit(s) you need to note the following: 

  1. If you provided no evidence of mitigating or extenuating circumstances, you will normally be retaking any failed unit as a final attempt. This is referred to as a “re-sit”.
  2. If you submitted evidence of serious extenuating circumstances e.g. illness, or if you missed an exam because of illness and complied with the requirements to submit self-certification and notify us before the start of the exam, the Exam Board may decide to allow you to retake unit(s) as a first attempt. This is referred to as a “supplementary” assessment.
  3. If you are re-sitting a unit as a first or final attempt, you may be required to take another exam or submit coursework or do both exam and coursework.
  4. If you are taking the unit as a final attempt, no previous marks will be included in your re-sit mark. Your re-sit mark will be based only on the work you are required to retake. You must therefore ensure that you achieve a pass mark for the work you redo, because no previous marks will be added to it. Your re-sit mark (which will be your final unit mark) will be based 100% on your re-sit work, and not in any way on your previous other marks, which will no longer be relevant.
  5. The format of the re-sit will be decided by the Unit Director. Detailed information, for example on coursework assignments, will be published via email during the first half of July. It will be your responsibility to ensure that you understand what re-sit you are taking, and to contact the Unit Director if you have not received instructions by 20th July.
  6. The marks from the assessment(s) which you originally passed will not be included in the re-sit mark unless you are taking the unit as a first attempt (see 8. below).
  7. If you are retaking a unit as a final attempt and achieve a mark above the minimum pass mark, your final unit mark will be capped at 50% for level 7 (M-level) units, or at 40% for lower level units, for the purpose of calculating your overall mark. For example, if you achieve 80% in your re-sit as a final attempt, you would have 50% as an overall unit mark, and 50% would be used in calculating your overall taught mark for the purposes of deciding the degree classification.
  8. If you are taking a supplementary assessment, treated as a first attempt, any marks you have previously achieved, which were not affected by any validated extenuating circumstances, will be combined with your new supplementary marks. For example, if you had a coursework mark of 70% but failed your exam in the summer and achieve a supplementary exam mark of 80% in September, your coursework and exam marks would be combined to give an overall unit mark of 75% (assuming equal weighting of coursework and exam). A mark of 75% would then be used in calculating your overall taught mark for the purposes of deciding the degree classification.
  9. If you fail your August/September re-sit (as a second/final attempt) and there are no validated extenuating circumstances, you will normally be required to withdraw from the MSc although you may be eligible for an exit award (e.g. PG Certificate).
  10. If you fail your re-sits in August/September and are taking them as a first attempt, or if you are taking your re-sits as a second attempt but are able to provide evidence of serious extenuating circumstances, you may be able to retake the failed unit(s) in the next academic year. However this would either have to be taken as a supplementary year, which would involve paying tuition fees pro rata for the units you are retaking, or you would have to return home and  retake the assessments when these are next routinely held, in the main exam periods.
  11. Re-sit exams take place between mid-August and early September.  If you must retake any exams, you must ensure you are available at that time.

Appendix 7. The Final Year

Section 30 in the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes (the Code) outlines the regulations for the award of credit for purposes of completion. Please refer to this in association with the section below:

  1. A BEng student must achieve at least 40% for their final year of study and pass the Project.  If both criteria are not achieved the student will be awarded either a Diploma of Higher Education or an Ordinary Degree, depending on the level of attainment.
  2. An MEng student must achieve at least 50% for their final year of study and pass the Project.  If both criteria are not achieved the student will be awarded a BEng degree (or BSc degree for Computer Science programmes) based on their first three years of study.  The degree classification rules will be the same as that for BEng/BSc students.
  3. Resits are not permitted for final year students, with the exception of the Project, where a final re-assessment opportunity will be offered.  The mark for a re-sat Project will be capped at 40% or 50% depending on the level of the Project being taken.
  4. An Ordinary degree can be awarded if a student has successfully completed at least 300 credits with a minimum of 60 credits at level 6 (H).
  5. Guidance on making awards to students who are unable to complete all the necessary assessment is detailed in Appendix 9 of the Code.

Please refer to the flowcharts below for BEng/MEng Degree awards:-

Flowchart for BEng and BSc degrees (PDF, 45kB)

Flowchart for MEng degrees (PDF, 46kB)

Edit this page