• Where can coral reefs relocate to escape the heat? 29 August 2013 The best real estate for coral reefs over the coming decades will no longer be around the equator but in the sub-tropics, new research from the University of Bristol suggests.
  • Bristol scientist to study new ways to tackle Alzheimer’s 28 August 2013 A project that will investigate new ways to protect brain cells from damage in Alzheimer’s will begin this month thanks to an Alzheimer’s Research UK grant. The one-year pilot project, led by Dr Nina Balthasar at the University of Bristol, could bring new treatments for Alzheimer’s a step closer.
  • Joan Skuse, 1929-2013 28 August 2013 Joan Skuse, former Domestic Supervisor for Social Science and Priory Road, passed away in August.
  • Not the end of the world: why Earth's greatest mass extinction was the making of modern mammals 28 August 2013 The ancient closest relatives of mammals – the cynodont therapsids – not only survived the greatest mass extinction of all time, 252 million years ago, but thrived in the aftermath, according to new research published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
  • New research explores public trust in A-Levels 23 August 2013 A new study that aims to explore public trust in A-Levels is seeking people to share their views. Results from the research, led by the University of Bristol, will be fed back to the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation and English exam boards.
  • Student’s epic 5,200km cycle challenge clocks up over £5,200 for charity 23 August 2013 A University of Bristol student has completed the challenge of a lifetime by cycling 3,500 miles across North America and raising over £5,200 for charity. Self-confessed ‘bike nut’ Marcus Farnfield powered his way across 15 US states and three mountain ranges in 46 days as he journeyed from Vancouver in Canada to Washington DC on the east coast of the US.
  • Bristol awarded its first Wellcome and NIH PhD studentship 23 August 2013 The Wellcome Trust and the US National Institutes of Health have awarded a four-year PhD studentship to Mahsa Samadi, for a joint project with Professor Zafar Bashir at Bristol and Dr Serena Dudek in the US.
  • Mentoring scheme attracts 70 companies 23 August 2013 Engineering and computer science undergraduates at the University of Bristol are being paired up with mentors at over 70 companies to give them a taste of working life within the industry. Over 600 new first year students will be offered an early step on the careers ladder thanks to the Industrial Mentoring Scheme, which was successfully launched last year.
  • 'Waiting strategy' helps street camera operators to judge suspicious events 22 August 2013 Closed circuit television camera operators may adopt an ‘accuracy over speed’ approach when viewing potentially suspicious behaviour, new research has revealed. The study, led by Nottingham Trent University, involved monitoring the suspiciousness of CCTV operators while tracking their eye movements.
  • World-leading penguin experts come to Bristol 22 August 2013 Penguin lovers will be treated to a unique insight into the charismatic birds’ lives as world-leading experts come to Bristol for the 8th International Penguin Conference. It’s the first time the conference has been held in Europe, with 200 delegates from 30 countries sharing their latest research and knowledge between 2 and 6 September.
  • EngD in Systems gains professional accreditation 22 August 2013 The University’s postgraduate research programme Engineering Doctorate in Systems has been accredited by the three leading professional engineering institutions.
  • New study shows behaviour problems at age three can affect GCSE grades 22 August 2013 Children who display hyperactivity, inattention and conduct problems at the age of three are at risk of worse academic outcomes at age 16, according to new research published in the British Journal of Psychiatry.
  • Study suggests chlamydia infection rates have changed over time but remains common among young women 21 August 2013 A study exploring the frequency of chlamydia antibodies among young women – a marker for current and past infection – found this increased between 1993 and 2002, and then declined from 2007 to 2010. The first ever English population-based study of chlamydia antibodies, led by researchers from the University of Bristol, Public Health England and Imperial College, is published today [21 Aug] in PLOS One.
  • One of UK's rarest bats spotted in Wiltshire woods 21 August 2013 During a night of bat trapping on Wiltshire Wildlife Trust’s Blackmoor Copse nature reserve, Phil Brown, an MSc student at the University of Bristol, identified a barbastelle bat. This is the first confirmed sighting of this elusive and rare species of bat on the reserve.
  • Epic ocean voyages of baby corals revealed 21 August 2013 For the first time, scientists have recreated the journeys of millimetre-sized baby coral through the world’s seas, suggesting some of these tiny adventurers may cross entire oceans. The study, by researchers from the Universities of Bristol and Miami, will help predict how coral reef distributions may change in response to changing oceans.
  • Fossil fishes come to life in Ilminster 21 August 2013 A collection of important fossil specimens are coming back to their home town in Somerset for an outreach open day, thanks to a partnership between Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution (BRLSI) and the University of Bristol.
  • From skateboards to a collaboration with eBay 20 August 2013 A software company that started life as a university start-up project has launched a real-time inventory and listings management platform available to esellers using one of the world’s biggest online marketplaces. Brightpearl, which began within SETsquared’s business incubator at the University of Bristol, is now providing its retail software to both ebay.co.uk and eBay.com.
  • Dogs could act as effective early-warning system for patients with diabetes 20 August 2013 Dogs that are trained to respond to their owners’ hypoglycaemia could offer a very effective way to alert diabetic patients of impending lowered blood sugars. The findings, published in the journal PLOS ONE, is the first academic study to assess whether trained dogs could be used as a reliable early-warning system to monitor glycaemia control.
  • ERC funds new study of animated film 20 August 2013 Dr Kristian Moen, Lecturer in Screen Studies, has been awarded a grant from the European Research Council for a study of the development of animated film.
  • September conference for Economics Network 16 August 2013 The Bristol-based Economics Network will host its seventh ‘Developments in Economics Education’ conference on 5-6 September, at the University of Exeter.
  • New web tool improves rapid ash cloud forecasts 16 August 2013 A new web tool, created by NERC-funded researchers at the University of Bristol, could pave the way for better management of airspace during volcanic crises.
  • Undergraduate admissions 2013 15 August 2013 The University of Bristol received around 40,000 applications for the 4,631 undergraduate places available across the full range of subjects from this September.
  • Exploring portrait photography at the M-Shed 14 August 2013 Staff members Dr Barnaby Haran and Dr Dorothy Rowe from the Department of History of Art will be giving lunchtime talks on different aspects of portrait photography in the M-Shed's current blockbuster exhibition the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize.
  • Bristol's Students’ Union wins NUS funding for innovative green projects 14 August 2013 University of Bristol Students’ Union (UBU) is proud to announce the launch of the Green Transformation Project, a sustainability scheme aiming to change the environmental behaviours of students at the University of Bristol.
  • Ancient mammal relatives cast light on recovery after mass extinction 14 August 2013 In the aftermath of the largest mass extinction in Earth history, anomodonts –ancient relatives of mammals – did not evolve any fundamentally new features, according to new research published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. This suggests that the evolutionary bottleneck they passed through during the extinction constrained their evolution during the recovery.
  • Wildflowers sown across Bristol to encourage insect life 13 August 2013 Cornflowers, poppies, buttercups and other wildflowers will be blooming across the city this summer as part of a three year, £1.3 million research project led by the University of Bristol.
  • Melting water's lubricating effect on glaciers has only 'minor' role in future sea-level rise 12 August 2013 Concerns that melting water would speed up the decline of Greenland’s ice sheet have been allayed by new research which shows the lubricating effect of water beneath glaciers will not significantly add to sea-level rise.
  • Fulbright Award for Bristol PhD 12 August 2013 Anna Long, a recently graduated PhD student from the University of Bristol, has received a prestigious Fulbright-Diabetes UK Research Award.
  • Bristol research seen by tens of thousands at Asia’s biggest science fair 9 August 2013 World-leading research being carried out in Bristol to identify the colour of prehistoric animals is being showcased at the largest science and technology fair in Asia, attracting some 1.2 million visitors each year.
  • Local health research to benefit from national investment to tackle major health challenges 9 August 2013 Health researchers in the West Country have been given a share of £124 million from the Government to enable them to tackle the area’s most pressing health problems.
  • Dan Hill, 1984-2013 9 August 2013 Dan Hill, who worked in the School of Social and Community Medicine and before that in the Department of Social Medicine in a number of different roles on a wide variety of projects for nearly a decade, died suddenly on 28 May 2013, aged 29 years. Professor Jenny Donovan offers this tribute.
  • Professor awarded prestigious Royal Society fellowship for memory research 9 August 2013 An expert in cellular mechanisms of memory at the University of Bristol has been awarded a prestigious Royal Society fellowship.
  • North Atlantic atmospheric circulation increases mountainous weather systems and river flow in upland Britain 8 August 2013 The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is the most important type of climatic variability in the northern hemisphere. It controls the strength of westerly winds between the “Azores high”’ and the “Icelandic low” that bring a succession of weather systems to Western Europe. New research has looked at the influence of the NAO on orographic precipitation, mountainous weather systems, and river flow in upland Britain.
  • Three months alone in the ocean as Elsa aims for record-breaking row 7 August 2013 Rowing for up to 16 hours a day, encountering unknown creatures at night and spending three months in solitude are just some of the challenges Elsa Hammond will face as she endeavours to row 2,400 miles across the Pacific Ocean. The PhD student from the University of Bristol is the only solo woman from the UK registered to take part in the Great Pacific Race 2014, a new route for ocean rowers from California to Hawaii.
  • Students shine in the Edinburgh spotlight 6 August 2013 Performers from the University of Bristol are out in force at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe this month, showcasing their talents at the largest arts festival in the world. Five groups are involved in a total of 11 shows as they join performers from all over the world for the famous festival which thrusts new acts into the spotlight every year.
  • Bristol researchers rewarded for excellence in psychopharmacology 6 August 2013 Bristol PhD students and academics from Professor Marcus Munafò’s and Dr Emma Robinson’s research groups were awarded six of 17 prizes for demonstrating excellence in clinical and non-clinical psychopharmacology and science communication at this year’s British Association for Psychopharmacology [BAP] summer meeting.
  • Dr Rebecca Pearson features on BBC Radio 4 programme 'The Pregnant Brain' today [Tue 6 Aug] 6 August 2013 Dr Rebecca Pearson, an epidemiologist from the University's School of Social and Community Medicine, will be talking about her research into the pregnant brain on a special BBC Radio 4 programme today [broadcast at 11 am] which explores the changes that take place in a woman's brain over the course of pregnancy including the effects of depression and stress.
  • New on-line forum on faith and public policy aims to prompt ‘spirited debate’ 5 August 2013 Are Muslims effective participants in governance or are they victims of policies over which they have little say? This is just one of the debates, featuring contributions from academics, think-tanks, policy-makers and the voluntary and community sectors, taking place on an innovative new on-line faith and public policy forum hosted by the University of Bristol.
  • Rhymin' and Stealin' – new book explores musical borrowing in hip-hop 5 August 2013 One of the most essential elements of hip-hop – musical borrowing – is the subject of a new book by University of Bristol musicologist, Dr Justin Williams.
  • Greater protection needed for one of Britain's rarest mammals: just 1,000 grey long-eared bats remain in the UK 5 August 2013 The grey long-eared bat should be afforded ‘UK Priority Species’ status, according to Dr Orly Razgour of the University of Bristol and colleagues in their newly published conservation management plan for the species.
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